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Apples and ashes : literature, nationalism, and the Confederate States of America / Coleman Hutchison.

By: Hutchison, Coleman, 1977-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.New southern studies: Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (277 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820343655; 082034365X.Subject(s): American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Apples and ashes.DDC classification: 810.9/35875 LOC classification: PS261 | .H88 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Great expectations: the imaginative literature of the Confederate States of America -- A history of the future: Southern literary nationalism before the Confederacy -- A new experiment in the art of book-making: engendering the Confederate national novel -- Southern amaranths: popularity, occasion, and media in a Confederate poetics of place -- The music of Mars: Confederate song, North and South -- In dreamland: the Confederate memoir at home and abroad.
Summary: "Apples and Ashes offers the first literary history of the Civil War South. The product of extensive archival research, it tells an expansive story about a nation struggling to write itself into existence. Confederate literature was in intimate conversation with other contemporary literary cultures, especially those of the United States and Britain. Thus, Coleman Hutchison argues, it has profound implications for our understanding of American literary nationalism and the relationship between literature and nationalism more broadly. Apples and Ashes is organized by genre, with each chapter using a single text or a small set of texts to limn a broader aspect of Confederate literary culture. Hutchison discusses an understudied and diverse archive of literary texts including the literary criticism of Edgar Allan Poe; southern responses to Uncle Tom's Cabin; the novels of Augusta Jane Evans; Confederate popular poetry; the de facto Confederate national anthem, "Dixie"; and several postwar southern memoirs. In addition to emphasizing the centrality of slavery to the Confederate literary imagination, the book also considers a series of novel topics: the reprinting of European novels in the Confederate South, including Charles Dickens's Great Expectations and Victor Hugo's Les Misérables; Confederate propaganda in Europe; and postwar Confederate emigration to Latin America. In discussing literary criticism, fiction, poetry, popular song, and memoir, Apples and Ashes reminds us of Confederate literature's once-great expectations. Before their defeat and abjection--before apples turned to ashes in their mouths--many Confederates thought they were in the process of creating a nation and a national literature that would endure."--Project Muse.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS261 .H88 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt46nnzg Available ocn781634984

Great expectations: the imaginative literature of the Confederate States of America -- A history of the future: Southern literary nationalism before the Confederacy -- A new experiment in the art of book-making: engendering the Confederate national novel -- Southern amaranths: popularity, occasion, and media in a Confederate poetics of place -- The music of Mars: Confederate song, North and South -- In dreamland: the Confederate memoir at home and abroad.

"Apples and Ashes offers the first literary history of the Civil War South. The product of extensive archival research, it tells an expansive story about a nation struggling to write itself into existence. Confederate literature was in intimate conversation with other contemporary literary cultures, especially those of the United States and Britain. Thus, Coleman Hutchison argues, it has profound implications for our understanding of American literary nationalism and the relationship between literature and nationalism more broadly. Apples and Ashes is organized by genre, with each chapter using a single text or a small set of texts to limn a broader aspect of Confederate literary culture. Hutchison discusses an understudied and diverse archive of literary texts including the literary criticism of Edgar Allan Poe; southern responses to Uncle Tom's Cabin; the novels of Augusta Jane Evans; Confederate popular poetry; the de facto Confederate national anthem, "Dixie"; and several postwar southern memoirs. In addition to emphasizing the centrality of slavery to the Confederate literary imagination, the book also considers a series of novel topics: the reprinting of European novels in the Confederate South, including Charles Dickens's Great Expectations and Victor Hugo's Les Misérables; Confederate propaganda in Europe; and postwar Confederate emigration to Latin America. In discussing literary criticism, fiction, poetry, popular song, and memoir, Apples and Ashes reminds us of Confederate literature's once-great expectations. Before their defeat and abjection--before apples turned to ashes in their mouths--many Confederates thought they were in the process of creating a nation and a national literature that would endure."--Project Muse.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hutchison's study of the literature of the Confederacy is unique, the first volume devoted exclusively to this subject. For years Edmund Wilson's Patriotic Gore (1962) has been the standard for studies of Civil War literature of the North and South, and Hutchison (Univ. of Texas, Austin) takes issue with Wilson on the achievement of Southern writing, especially poetry, during this period. Wilson in general applied the principle of "the best that has been thought and said," espoused by Matthew Arnold, and Hutchison approaches Confederate literature as means of "understanding ... American literary nationalism and the relation between literature and nationalism more broadly." He argues that "Confederate literary nationalism was a triangulated phenomenon," distinct from the North and sympathetic to Europe. He sees the war writing of the new state as the beginning of a future literature with its writers exhibiting an unusual consciousness of the role of literature in building a state. He examines novels, especially Augusta Evans's Macaria; poems, including those by Henry Timrod, Paul Hamilton Hayne, and William Gilmore Simms; songs, with emphasis on the variations of "Dixie"; memoirs, nearly exclusively Loreta Janeta Valezquez's The Woman in Battle; and journals, with emphasis on The Southern Literary Messenger. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. T. Bonner Jr. emeritus, Xavier University of Louisiana

Author notes provided by Syndetics

COLEMAN HUTCHISON is an assistant professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin.

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