Sharing : culture and the economy in the Internet age / Philippe Aigrain ; with contributions by Suzanne Aigrain.

By: Aigrain, Philippe [author.]Contributor(s): Aigrain, SuzanneMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Amsterdam : Amsterdam University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (242 pages) : illustrations, chartsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9789048515349; 9048515343Subject(s): Computer file sharing -- Social aspects | Computer file sharing -- Economic aspects | Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.) -- Social aspects | Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.) -- Economic aspects | Intellectual property -- Social aspects | Intellectual property -- Economic aspects | Information societyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sharing.DDC classification: 301 LOC classification: HM851 | .A354 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Setting the scene -- The Internet and creativity debate -- The value of non-market sharing -- Sustainable resources for creative activities -- The Creative Contribution -- Which rights for whom? A choice of models -- Defining rights and obligations -- How much? -- Sustainable financing for the commons -- Implementation -- Organization and complementary policy measures -- Usage measurement for equitable rewards -- Clarification and counter-arguments -- From proposal to reality -- Diversity of attention for beginners -- The total cost of rewards and their distribution -- Modeling usage measurement.
Summary: "In the past fifteen years, file sharing of digital cultural works between individuals has been at the center of a number of debates on the future of culture itself. To some, sharing constitutes piracy, to be fought against and eradicated. Others see it as unavoidable, and table proposals to compensate for its harmful effects. Meanwhile, little progress has been made towards addressing the real challenges facing culture in a digital world. Sharing starts from a radically different viewpoint, namely that the non-market sharing of digital works is both legitimate and useful. It supports this premise with empirical research, demonstrating that non-market sharing leads to more diversity in the attention given to various works. Taking stock of what we have learned about the cultural economy in recent years, Sharing sets out the conditions necessary for valuable cultural functions to remain sustainable in this context. Our software and datasets can be downloaded from the book site at http://www.sharing-thebook.net. On the same site, the reader can also run our models with adjusted parameters and upload datasets in order to run our algorithms for the study of diversity of attention"--Publisher's description.
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HM851 -- .W55155 2011 Teletechnologies, Place, and Community. HM851 .A253 2012 Access contested : HM851 .A335 2015 Oversharing. HM851 .A354 2012 Sharing : HM851 .A744 2019 The next billion users : digital life beyond the West / HM851 .A87 2012 Cypherpunks : HM851 .B364 2015 Activism on the Web :

Setting the scene -- The Internet and creativity debate -- The value of non-market sharing -- Sustainable resources for creative activities -- The Creative Contribution -- Which rights for whom? A choice of models -- Defining rights and obligations -- How much? -- Sustainable financing for the commons -- Implementation -- Organization and complementary policy measures -- Usage measurement for equitable rewards -- Clarification and counter-arguments -- From proposal to reality -- Appendixes -- Diversity of attention for beginners -- The total cost of rewards and their distribution -- Modeling usage measurement.

"In the past fifteen years, file sharing of digital cultural works between individuals has been at the center of a number of debates on the future of culture itself. To some, sharing constitutes piracy, to be fought against and eradicated. Others see it as unavoidable, and table proposals to compensate for its harmful effects. Meanwhile, little progress has been made towards addressing the real challenges facing culture in a digital world. Sharing starts from a radically different viewpoint, namely that the non-market sharing of digital works is both legitimate and useful. It supports this premise with empirical research, demonstrating that non-market sharing leads to more diversity in the attention given to various works. Taking stock of what we have learned about the cultural economy in recent years, Sharing sets out the conditions necessary for valuable cultural functions to remain sustainable in this context. Our software and datasets can be downloaded from the book site at http://www.sharing-thebook.net. On the same site, the reader can also run our models with adjusted parameters and upload datasets in order to run our algorithms for the study of diversity of attention"--Publisher's description.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 221-229) and index.

Print version record.

En.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this creative work, Aigrain (CEO, Sopinspace--Society for Public Information Spaces) and contributor Suzanne Aigrain (Oxford Univ.) have obviously spent a great deal of time imagining what the future holds for cultural interaction in the Internet age. They describe a new model of enhanced sharing of cultural resources, offering a tremendous array of ideas for readers to digest. One consistent point is that profit-centered, concentrated markets will limit access to and exposure of ideas, artifacts, and creative works. To prevent the predicted welfare losses, the authors imagine a commons where cultural riches can be shared absent the rent seeking of agents with undue control. The arguments include methods to compensate creative contributors adequately while keeping the cost to those accessing material low. Governments would collect fees to reward producers and encourage future developments. Apparently these would not be taxes, since the revenues would be directed to specific uses and not become part of the governments' general budgets. This "non-market" solution, with its lengthy discussion of payments by consumers and rewards to producers, with an impartial umpire determining the amounts after collecting a vast quantity of relevant data, sounds much like Oskar Lange's vision of a socialist marketplace. Provocative reading for sophisticated audiences. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional audiences. J. M. Nowakowski Muskingum University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Philippe Aigrain is the CEO of Sopinspace - Society for Public Information Spaces and one of the founders of La Quadrature du Net. Suzanne Aigrain is lecturer in astrophysics at Oxford University and a fellow of All Souls College.

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