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Mexicanos : a history of Mexicans in the United States / Manuel G. Gonzales.

By: Gonzales, Manuel G.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2009Edition: 2nd ed.Description: 1 online resource (394 pages, [16] pages of plates) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780253007773; 0253007771.Subject(s): Mexican Americans -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Mexicanos.DDC classification: 973/.046872 LOC classification: E184.M5 | G638 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1: Spaniards and Native Americans, prehistory-1521 -- 2: Spanish frontier, 1521-1821 -- 3: Mexican far north, 1821-1848 -- 4: American Southwest, 1848-1900 -- 5: Great migration, 1900-1930 -- 6: Depression, 1930-1940 -- 7: Second World War and its aftermath, 1940-1965 -- 8: Chicano movement, 1965-1975 -- 9: Goodbye to Aztlan, 1975-1994 -- 10: Hispanic challenge, 1994-present -- Appendix A: National association for Chicana and Chicano studies scholars of the year -- Appendix B: Hispanic American medal of honor recipients -- Appendix C: Mexican American historical novels -- Notes -- Select bibliography of works since 1985 -- Index.
Summary: From the Publisher: Newly revised and updated, Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and tempered by an often difficult existence, Mexicans continue to play an important role in U.S. society, even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. Thorough and balanced, Mexicanos makes a valuable contribution to the understanding of the Mexican population of the United States-a growing minority who are a vital presence in 21st-century America.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.M5 G638 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt16gz4w8 Available ocn784884366

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1: Spaniards and Native Americans, prehistory-1521 -- 2: Spanish frontier, 1521-1821 -- 3: Mexican far north, 1821-1848 -- 4: American Southwest, 1848-1900 -- 5: Great migration, 1900-1930 -- 6: Depression, 1930-1940 -- 7: Second World War and its aftermath, 1940-1965 -- 8: Chicano movement, 1965-1975 -- 9: Goodbye to Aztlan, 1975-1994 -- 10: Hispanic challenge, 1994-present -- Appendix A: National association for Chicana and Chicano studies scholars of the year -- Appendix B: Hispanic American medal of honor recipients -- Appendix C: Mexican American historical novels -- Notes -- Select bibliography of works since 1985 -- Index.

From the Publisher: Newly revised and updated, Mexicanos tells the rich and vibrant story of Mexicans in the United States. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and tempered by an often difficult existence, Mexicans continue to play an important role in U.S. society, even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. Thorough and balanced, Mexicanos makes a valuable contribution to the understanding of the Mexican population of the United States-a growing minority who are a vital presence in 21st-century America.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A self-proclaimed nonactivist who nevertheless considers himself a "Chicano historian" because he experienced and was positively influenced by the Chicano movement of the 1960s, Gonzales has written a new synthesis of Mexican-American/Chicano history based on the prodigious scholarship of the last 30 years. In so doing, he offers an alternative to the earlier generation of histories--represented quintessentially by Rodolfo Acu^D na's seminal work Occupied America (CH, Mar'81), which he critiques as ideological and lacking in objectivity and balance. Voicing serious concern with the "internal colony" theoretical model and "victimization" approach to Chicano history exemplified in the works of his predecessors, Gonzales offers instead a "narrative history" (defined here as "who did what when") from Mexico's pre-Conquest past to literally the present day, 1998. Because this is a synthesis of research to date, the author acknowledges certain shortcomings, notably its limited attention to women, i.e., Mexicanas and Chicanas. The text tends to be dry and reads at times like a chronology and listing of events, people, and accomplishments, and at other times like a bibliographic essay summarizing the findings of notable scholars and writers. It will not supplant Occupied America but can serve as a useful companion. Particularly useful select bibliography. E. Hu-DeHart University of Colorado at Boulder

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Manuel G. Gonzales is Professor of History at Diablo Valley College. His books include Andrea Costa and the Rise of Socialism in the Romagna and The Hispanic Elite of the Southwest. He is editor (with Cynthia Gonzales) of En Aquel Entonces (IUP, 2000).</p>

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