Embodiment and the New Shape of Black Theological Thought.

By: Pinn, Anthony BMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksReligion, Race, & Ethnicity: Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (224 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814768518; 0814768512Subject(s): Human body -- Religious aspects -- Christianity | Theological anthropology -- Christianity | Black theologyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Embodiment and the New Shape of Black Theological Thought.DDC classification: 202.08996 LOC classification: BT702 .P56 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Preface; Introduction; PART ONE: BODY CONSTRUCTION; 1 Theological Posturing; 2 Blackness and the Identifying of Bodies; 3 What to Make of Gendered Bodies?: Addressing the Male Problem; 4 Sex(uality) and the (Un)Doing of Bodies; PART TWO: BODIES IN MOTION; 5 Bodies as the Site of Religious Struggle: A Musical Mapping; 6 On the Redemption of Bodies; 7 Bodies in the World; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; About the Author.
Summary: Black theology tends to be a theology about no-body. Though one might assume that black and womanist theology have already given significant attention to the nature and meaning of black bodies as a theological issue, this inquiry has primarily taken the form of a focus on issues relating to liberation, treating the body in abstract terms rather than focusing on the experiencing of a material, fleshy reality. By focusing on the body as a physical entity and not just a metaphorical one, Pinn offers a new approach to theological thinking about race, gender, and sexuality. According to Pinn, the b.
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Acknowledgments; Preface; Introduction; PART ONE: BODY CONSTRUCTION; 1 Theological Posturing; 2 Blackness and the Identifying of Bodies; 3 What to Make of Gendered Bodies?: Addressing the Male Problem; 4 Sex(uality) and the (Un)Doing of Bodies; PART TWO: BODIES IN MOTION; 5 Bodies as the Site of Religious Struggle: A Musical Mapping; 6 On the Redemption of Bodies; 7 Bodies in the World; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; About the Author.

Black theology tends to be a theology about no-body. Though one might assume that black and womanist theology have already given significant attention to the nature and meaning of black bodies as a theological issue, this inquiry has primarily taken the form of a focus on issues relating to liberation, treating the body in abstract terms rather than focusing on the experiencing of a material, fleshy reality. By focusing on the body as a physical entity and not just a metaphorical one, Pinn offers a new approach to theological thinking about race, gender, and sexuality. According to Pinn, the b.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pinn's reflective forays into and proposals for the study of embodiment in black theological thought constitute his most substantive work since his first book on the implications of theodicy for black theology (Why Lord?: Suffering and Evil in Black Theology, CH, Sep'96, 34-0258). Deeply influenced by the work of Michel Foucault and the postmodern focus on the body, Pinn (Rice Univ.) challenges the paucity of reflection on the black body as a material and discursive reality in black liberation and womanist theologies. His humanist and multidisciplinary approach to the black body differs from Shawn Copeland's Christian perspective and Edward Curtis's analysis of changes in black bodies in the Nation of Islam. Pinn's great strength is to emphasize an aesthetic methodology. His most creative chapters elaborate on the theme of the body in black music--from spirituals and blues to rap, particularly in the contributions of Tupac Shakur. Curiously omitted, but relevant to the theme of the body, are reflections on health care issues in black communities and churches. The contemporary reality is that high blood pressure, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS affect black bodies. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. L. H. Mamiya Vassar College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

PinnAnthony B.:

Anthony B. Pinn is Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities and Professor of Religious Studies at Rice University, where he also serves as the executive director of the Society for the Study of Black Religion. His books include Varieties of African-American Religious Experience, Why Lord?: Suffering and Evil in Black Theology, and By These Hands: A Documentary History of African-American Humanism (NYU Press, 2001).

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