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Not guilty : are the acquitted innocent? / Daniel Givelber and Amy Farrell.

By: Givelber, Daniel.
Contributor(s): Farrell, Amy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814725344; 0814725341; 9780814744406; 0814744400.Subject(s): Judicial error -- United States | Criminal procedure -- United States | Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States | Jury -- United States | Judges -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Not guilty.DDC classification: 345.73/0122 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Invisible innocence -- Judge and jury decisions to acquit: what we know from social science research -- Screening for innocence -- Understanding why judges and juries disagree about criminal case outcomes: are jury verdicts an expression of sentiment? -- The defense case -- The impact of race on judge and jury decision making.
Summary: "As scores of death row inmates are exonerated by DNA evidence and innocence commissions are set up across the country, conviction of the innocent has become a well-recognized problem. But our justice system makes both kinds of errors—we acquit the guilty and convict the innocent—and exploring the reasons why people are acquitted can help us to evaluate the efficiency and fairness of our criminal justice system. Not Guilty provides a sustained examination and analysis of the factors that lead juries to find defendants “not guilty,” as well as the connection between those factors and the possibility of factual innocence, examining why some criminal trials result in not guilty verdicts and what those verdicts suggest about the accuracy of our criminal process"--publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF9756 .G59 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qgk1w Available ocn794003583

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

"As scores of death row inmates are exonerated by DNA evidence and innocence commissions are set up across the country, conviction of the innocent has become a well-recognized problem. But our justice system makes both kinds of errors—we acquit the guilty and convict the innocent—and exploring the reasons why people are acquitted can help us to evaluate the efficiency and fairness of our criminal justice system. Not Guilty provides a sustained examination and analysis of the factors that lead juries to find defendants “not guilty,” as well as the connection between those factors and the possibility of factual innocence, examining why some criminal trials result in not guilty verdicts and what those verdicts suggest about the accuracy of our criminal process"--publisher's description.

Invisible innocence -- Judge and jury decisions to acquit: what we know from social science research -- Screening for innocence -- Understanding why judges and juries disagree about criminal case outcomes: are jury verdicts an expression of sentiment? -- The defense case -- The impact of race on judge and jury decision making.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Are individuals who are accused of crimes but acquitted by juries actually innocent? This is the fascinating legal question explored in this book. The received wisdom of juries studies is that acquittals really do not mean that jurors think the person is innocent, such as in the famous case of the O. J. Simpson murder trial. Instead, for some reason, a mistake occurred. The sources of these mistakes range from a rogue jury to a badly performing prosecutor. This book challenges the mistakes theory, especially in light of recent exonerations of those on death row by DNA evidence. Drawing upon extensive data from the National Center for State Courts in four cities, Givelber (Northeastern Univ. School of Law) and Farrell (Northeastern Univ.) explore the reasons for acquittals. They challenge the results of other studies, including Harry Kalven and Hans Zeisel's famous 1966 study The American Jury. Givelber and Farrell conclude that in many cases the jury actually does believe that the defendant is innocent, although in many cases the reasons for the acquittal do include a failure of the prosecution to carry its evidentiary burden. Excellent acquisition for criminal justice, law, and crime collections. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. D. Schultz Hamline University

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