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The accidental city : improvising New Orleans / Lawrence N. Powell.

By: Powell, Lawrence N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (422 pages) : illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674068933; 0674068939; 9780674065444; 0674065441.Subject(s): French -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History | Spaniards -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History | British -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History | Slavery -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Accidental city.DDC classification: 976.3/35 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
An impossible river -- A landjobbing scheme -- Utopian by design -- Improvising a city -- Changing of the guard -- In contraband we trust -- A Creole city -- Slavery and the struggle for mastery -- The slaves remake themselves -- A new people, a new racial order -- The American gateway -- Epilogue.
Summary: Chronicles the history of the city from its being contended over as swampland through Louisiana's statehood in 1812, discussing its motley identities as a French village, African market town, Spanish fortress, and trade center.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F379.N557 P68 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2jbxrj Available ocn794003983

Includes bibliographical references (pages 361-400) and index.

An impossible river -- A landjobbing scheme -- Utopian by design -- Improvising a city -- Changing of the guard -- In contraband we trust -- A Creole city -- Slavery and the struggle for mastery -- The slaves remake themselves -- A new people, a new racial order -- The American gateway -- Epilogue.

Chronicles the history of the city from its being contended over as swampland through Louisiana's statehood in 1812, discussing its motley identities as a French village, African market town, Spanish fortress, and trade center.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Erected on infested swampland, New Orleans is a city that, in practical terms, never should have existed. However, its location at the mouth of the mighty Mississippi-the largest river in North America and fourth largest in the world-meant that this was a city destined to flourish. Profiling its founders, Powell (James H. Clark Endowed Chair in American Civilization & director, New Orleans Ctr. for the Gulf South, Tulane Univ.) details the late 17th-century birth and evolution of this diverse city that has a love-hate relationship with its residents. His research, which focuses on those emerging years rather than recent history, coupled with his profound understanding of his subject, deepens readers' appreciation and understanding of this city. VERDICT Though this volume, complete with illustrations and maps, could easily serve as a source for a sophisticated formal study of New Orleans/Louisiana history, it is also accessible to general readers seeking deep and contextualized information on this topic, especially if they're prepared to dive right into the subject without much lead-in. Recommended for all collections covering the early history of New Orleans and Louisiana.-Sonnet Ireland, Univ. of New Orleans Lib. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Few North American cities enjoy the extremes in perception that characterize New Orleans. Some visitors relish the nonstop partying on Bourbon Street and the general carefree abandon evident citywide; others loath the stifling heat and humidity, fear the ubiquitous crime, and/or resent the perceived ascendance of pagan ribaldry. Prevailing perceptions of the Crescent City are long established, but the disaster of Hurricane Katrina recast interpretations of New Orleans to include acknowledgement of its humanity. Powell (Tulane) advances sympathetic understanding of what very well may be the US's most curious city. He traces the dynamics of politics and business that ultimately located a city in virtually uninhabitable swampland. The lively narrative continues from the French through the Spanish colonial periods, concluding with Louisiana statehood in 1812, all the while revealing the disparate forces that bound the city together just as they threatened to tear it apart. Consistent with the author's established interests, race and race relations remain central to this interpretation. Readers may not agree with all aspects of Powell's argument, but they are certain to find this an intriguing read that answers scores of questions about a complex city. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and undergraduate collections. S. C. Hyde Southeastern Louisiana University

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