Cow boys and cattle men : class and masculinities on the Texas frontier, 1865-1900 / Jacqueline M. Moore.

By: Moore, Jacqueline M, 1965-Contributor(s): William P. Clements Center for Southwest StudiesMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New York : New York University Press, ©2010. 2012)Description: 1 online resource (xii, 269 pages :) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814759844; 081475984XSubject(s): Frontier and pioneer life -- TexasAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Cow boys and cattle men.DDC classification: 305.33/6362130976409034 LOC classification: F391 | .M934 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Doing the job -- Of men and cattle -- From boys to men -- At work -- Having fun -- A society of men -- Men and women -- In town -- Epilogue: the cowboy becomes myth.
Review: "Cowboys are an American legend, but despite their ubiquity in history and popular culture, misperceptions abound. Technically, a cowboy worked with cattle, as a ranch hand, while his boss, the cattleman, owned the ranch. Jacqueline M. Moore casts aside romantic and one-dimensional images of cowboys by analyzing the class, gender, and labor histories of ranching in Texas during the second half of the nineteenth century." "As working-classmen, cowboys showed their masculinity through their skills at work as well as public displays in town. But what cowboys thought was manly behavior did not always match those ideas of the business-minded cattlemen who largely absorbed middle-class masculine ideals of restraint. Real men, by these standards, had self-mastery over their impulses and didn't fight, drink, gamble, or consort with "unsavory" women, Moore explores how, in contrast to the mythic image, from the late 1870s on, as the Texas frontier became more settled and the open range disappeared, the real cowboys faced increasing demands from the people around them to rein in the very traits that Americans considered the most masculine."--Jacket.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F391 .M934 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qgd7j Available ocn794698898

OldControl:muse9780814759844.

"Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University."

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Doing the job -- Of men and cattle -- From boys to men -- At work -- Having fun -- A society of men -- Men and women -- In town -- Epilogue: the cowboy becomes myth.

"Cowboys are an American legend, but despite their ubiquity in history and popular culture, misperceptions abound. Technically, a cowboy worked with cattle, as a ranch hand, while his boss, the cattleman, owned the ranch. Jacqueline M. Moore casts aside romantic and one-dimensional images of cowboys by analyzing the class, gender, and labor histories of ranching in Texas during the second half of the nineteenth century." "As working-classmen, cowboys showed their masculinity through their skills at work as well as public displays in town. But what cowboys thought was manly behavior did not always match those ideas of the business-minded cattlemen who largely absorbed middle-class masculine ideals of restraint. Real men, by these standards, had self-mastery over their impulses and didn't fight, drink, gamble, or consort with "unsavory" women, Moore explores how, in contrast to the mythic image, from the late 1870s on, as the Texas frontier became more settled and the open range disappeared, the real cowboys faced increasing demands from the people around them to rein in the very traits that Americans considered the most masculine."--Jacket.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this short but significant book, Moore (Austin College) offers a convincing corrective to the romanticized views of cowboys and cattlemen advanced by purveyors of popular culture in the US. She contends that cowboys were essentially working-class men who rode horses and herded cattle, but whose values were similar to workers in other lines of work. Ranch owners, on the other hand, were men for whom cattle were profitable commodities. They were generally middle-class men whose ambitions were similar to those of Gilded Age captains of industry. Texas cowboys and cattlemen served as prototypes for the cattle frontier of the American West. They held contrasting views of masculinity, a theme that underlies Moore's book. For example, cowboys who "tore up the cow towns" and consorted with prostitutes did not view their conduct as reckless and outrageous. The town was their arena, and their activities were rituals of masculinity. Cattlemen, who often had family and friends in town, reflected a middle-class masculinity that stressed restraint, control, and stability. An end chapter critiques how cowboys have been transformed into iconic figures of US culture. Moore's book is provocative in its theme and informative in its coverage of the work of both cowboys and cattlemen. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General and undergraduate collections. L. B. Gimelli emeritus, Eastern Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MooreJacqueline M.:

Jacqueline M. Moore is Professor of History at Austin College in Sherman, Texas. She is the author of several books, including Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois and the Struggle for Racial Uplift.

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