Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The age of smoke : environmental policy in Germany and the United States, 1880-1970 / Frank Uekoetter.

By: Uekötter, Frank, 1970-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.History of the urban environment: Publisher: Pittsburgh, Pa. : University of Pittsburgh Press, ©2009. 2012)Description: 1 online resource (viii, 350 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780822973508; 0822973502.Uniform titles: Von der Rauchplage zur ökologischen Revolution. English Subject(s): Environmental policy -- United States -- History | Environmental policy -- Germany -- History | Smoke prevention -- United States -- History | Smoke prevention -- Germany -- History | Air quality management -- United States -- History | Air quality management -- Germany -- History | Air -- Pollution -- United States -- History | Air -- Pollution -- Germany -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Age of smoke.DDC classification: 363.738/70943 LOC classification: RA576.7.G3 | U3413 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The age of smoke -- Modern times, modern problems : controlling smoke, 1880-1914 -- Pollutants and politics : air pollution control between the wars -- Beyond the pall of smoke -- Going local, going national : the postwar divergence of environmental policy -- Forerunners and pioneers -- Environmental revolutions and evolutions -- Conclusion : Was the environmental revolution necessary?
Summary: In 1880, coal was the primary energy source for everything from home heating to industry. Regions where coal was readily available, such as the Ruhr Valley in Germany and western Pennsylvania in the United States, witnessed exponential growth-yet also suffered the greatest damage from coal pollution. These conditions prompted civic activism in the form of "anti-smoke" campaigns to attack the unsightly physical manifestations of coal burning. This early period witnessed significant cooperation between industrialists, government, and citizens to combat the smoke problem. It was not until the 1960.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RA576.7.G3 U3413 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qh8dk Available ocn794927929
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
RA576 .A46 1999eb Air pollution and health / RA576 .A85 2014 Atmospheric Pollution : RA576 .L4 Photochemistry of Air Pollution. RA576.7.G3 U3413 2009 The age of smoke : RA577 | RA577.5.M87 2006 Sick Building Syndrome and the Problem of Uncertainty RA577 .D634 2013 Inhaled Particles VI : RA577.D8 D385 2013 Inhaled Particles and Vapours :

Includes bibliographical references (pages 273-340) and index.

The age of smoke -- Modern times, modern problems : controlling smoke, 1880-1914 -- Pollutants and politics : air pollution control between the wars -- Beyond the pall of smoke -- Going local, going national : the postwar divergence of environmental policy -- Forerunners and pioneers -- Environmental revolutions and evolutions -- Conclusion : Was the environmental revolution necessary?

Text in English; translated from the German.

Print version record.

In 1880, coal was the primary energy source for everything from home heating to industry. Regions where coal was readily available, such as the Ruhr Valley in Germany and western Pennsylvania in the United States, witnessed exponential growth-yet also suffered the greatest damage from coal pollution. These conditions prompted civic activism in the form of "anti-smoke" campaigns to attack the unsightly physical manifestations of coal burning. This early period witnessed significant cooperation between industrialists, government, and citizens to combat the smoke problem. It was not until the 1960.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Comparative approaches to historical periods offer unique insights; this is particularly the case with Uekoetter's Age of Smoke. The US and Germany emerged as contemporary industrial giants in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Smoke and pollution were concomitant with industrialism, and both nations had to cope with this side effect. Uekoetter (Res. Inst. Deutsches Museum, Munich) considers the manner in which protest movements, bureaucracies, agencies, institutions, and individuals sought to deter the industrial impact (initially aimed at reducing smoke density in industrial cities) and how environmental concerns evolved in the US and Germany. This first monograph in the publisher's "History of the Urban Environment" series emerges as a meticulously researched study that will appeal to those with some expertise in environmental concerns. Uekoetter "focuses on the specific national conditions that shaped [environmental] debates and decisions" in both countries; in this sense, his book succeeds. Environmentalists as well as those with interests in German and US history will gain much from this work. Peter Krass's biography Carnegie (CH, May'03, 40-5289) is a worthwhile companion to read for background. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Frank Uekotter is a Dilthey Fellow with the Research Institute of the Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany, where his research focuses on the history of agricultural knowledge. Formerly, he was a researcher with Bielefeld University's Department of History.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.