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The wrong complexion for protection : how the government response to disaster endangers African American communities / Robert D. Bullard and Beverly Wright.

By: Bullard, Robert D. (Robert Doyle), 1946-.
Contributor(s): Wright, Beverly (Sociologist).
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 299 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814771938; 0814771939; 9780814763841; 0814763847.Subject(s): Disaster relief -- Social aspects -- United States | African Americans -- Civil rights | African Americans -- Social conditions | Racism in public welfare -- United States | Racism in social services -- United States | Racism -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Wrong complexion for protection.DDC classification: 363.34/808996073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: anatomy of vulnerability -- Race, place, and the environment in a small southern town: a personal perspective from Robert D. Bullard -- Growing up in a city that care forgot, New Orleans: a personal perspective from Beverly Wright -- The legacy of bias: hurricanes, droughts, and floods -- Recovery and reconstruction in post-Katrina New Orleans: a time for healing and renewal -- The wrong complexion for protection: response to toxic contamination -- Nightmare on Eno Road: poisoned water and toxic racism in Dickson, Tennessee -- Living and dying on the fenceline: response to industrial accidents -- Separate and unequal treatment: response to health emergencies, human experiments, and bioterrorism threats -- Critical conditions: fixing a broken system.
Summary: "When the images of desperate, hungry, thirsty, sick, mostly black people circulated in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, it became apparent that race did indeed matter when it came to government assistance. In The Wrong Complexion for Protection, Robert D. Bullard and Beverly Wright place the government response to natural and human-induced disasters in historical context over the past eight decades. They compare and contrast how the government responded to emergencies, including environmental and public health emergencies, toxic contamination, industrial accidents, bioterrorism threats and show that African Americans are disproportionately affected. Bullard and Wright argue that uncovering and eliminating disparate disaster response can mean the difference between life and death for those most vulnerable in disastrous times"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV555.U6 B846 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qggrp Available ocn801411067

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: anatomy of vulnerability -- Race, place, and the environment in a small southern town: a personal perspective from Robert D. Bullard -- Growing up in a city that care forgot, New Orleans: a personal perspective from Beverly Wright -- The legacy of bias: hurricanes, droughts, and floods -- Recovery and reconstruction in post-Katrina New Orleans: a time for healing and renewal -- The wrong complexion for protection: response to toxic contamination -- Nightmare on Eno Road: poisoned water and toxic racism in Dickson, Tennessee -- Living and dying on the fenceline: response to industrial accidents -- Separate and unequal treatment: response to health emergencies, human experiments, and bioterrorism threats -- Critical conditions: fixing a broken system.

Print version record.

"When the images of desperate, hungry, thirsty, sick, mostly black people circulated in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, it became apparent that race did indeed matter when it came to government assistance. In The Wrong Complexion for Protection, Robert D. Bullard and Beverly Wright place the government response to natural and human-induced disasters in historical context over the past eight decades. They compare and contrast how the government responded to emergencies, including environmental and public health emergencies, toxic contamination, industrial accidents, bioterrorism threats and show that African Americans are disproportionately affected. Bullard and Wright argue that uncovering and eliminating disparate disaster response can mean the difference between life and death for those most vulnerable in disastrous times"--Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Bringing to light what is a largely neglected topic, Bullard (public affairs, Texas Southern Univ. in Houston) and Wright (sociology, Dillard Univ.) have written a thought-provoking treatise on how the US government responds to disasters in African American communities. Despite what may have the superficial appearance of inflammatory and sensationalist rhetoric, the authors have produced a remarkably measured synthesis of argumentation and documentation. Rich with analysis and a variety of case studies in recent US history, this relatively dense book is a fine achievement. Having been deeply affected by Hurricane Katrina, the authors have a vested interest in communicating their research on the complicated relationship between the environment and social justice. The frequent and detailed mention of dates, locations, and case studies can be overwhelming at times and can occasionally detract from the flow of the book, but ultimately does not take away from its central thesis: African American communities do not receive the same level of support, attention, or care when it comes to disaster responsiveness as do white communities. A fine overview for those interested in the subject matter. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. Gamsby Duke University

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