Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Stalking the subject : modernism and the animal / Carrie Rohman.

By: Rohman, Carrie.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (xii, 192 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780231518567; 0231518560.Subject(s): Animals in literature | Animals -- Symbolic aspects | Ethics in literature | Evolution (Biology) in literature | Human-animal relationships in literature | Modernism (Literature) -- Great BritainAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Stalking the Subject : Modernism and the Animal.DDC classification: 820.9/362 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; 1. The Animal Among Others; 2. Imperialism and Disavowal; 3. Facing the Animal; 4. Recuperating the Animal; 5. Revising the Human; Conclusion: Animal Studies, Ethics, and the Humanities; Notes; Works Cited; Index.
Summary: Human and animal subjectivity converge in a historically unprecedented way within modernism, as evolutionary theory, imperialism, antirationalism, and psychoanalysis all grapple with the place of the human in relation to the animal. Drawing on the thought of Jacques Derrida and Georges Bataille, Carrie Rohman outlines the complex philosophical and ethical stakes involved in theorizing the animal in humanism, including the difficulty in determining an ontological place for the animal, the question of animal consciousness and language, and the paradoxical status of the human as both a pr.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR468.A56 R64 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/rohm14506 Available ocn811410831

Includes bibliographical references (pages 177-183) and index.

Acknowledgments; 1. The Animal Among Others; 2. Imperialism and Disavowal; 3. Facing the Animal; 4. Recuperating the Animal; 5. Revising the Human; Conclusion: Animal Studies, Ethics, and the Humanities; Notes; Works Cited; Index.

Human and animal subjectivity converge in a historically unprecedented way within modernism, as evolutionary theory, imperialism, antirationalism, and psychoanalysis all grapple with the place of the human in relation to the animal. Drawing on the thought of Jacques Derrida and Georges Bataille, Carrie Rohman outlines the complex philosophical and ethical stakes involved in theorizing the animal in humanism, including the difficulty in determining an ontological place for the animal, the question of animal consciousness and language, and the paradoxical status of the human as both a pr.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

With this book, Rohman (Lafayette College) makes an important contribution to both modernist literary studies and the developing field of animal studies. Informed by such theorists as Jacques Derrida and Cary Wolfe, and the psychoanalytic theory of Slavoj Zizek, the book focuses on (typically canonical) texts by a wide range of Anglo-American modernist authors, including H. G. Wells, T. S. Eliot, Joseph Conrad, and D. H. Lawrence. Early chapters concentrate on modernist writers' engagement with evolutionary theory and imperialism, but perhaps Rohman's most valuable contribution is her analysis of Lawrence's "posthumanism." Though brief, Rohman's speculative conclusion, "Animal Studies, Ethics, and the Humanities," is one of the volume's more useful discussions. Rohman engages with a substantial amount of theory and scholarship on individual authors, but the book remains accessible to any determined reader due to her engaging, clear writing style and her compelling critical readings of specific modernist texts. This study nicely complements recent work on Victorian responses to animals, for example, Victorian Animal Dreams: Representations of Animals in Victorian Literature and Culture, ed. by Deborah Denenholz Morse and Martin Danahay (CH, May'08, 45-4845). Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. D. Morrison Morehead State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Carrie Rohman is assistant professor of English at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.