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The ethos of drama : rhetorical theory and dramatic worth / Robert L. King.

By: King, Robert L. (Robert Leo).
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Catholic University of America Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (x, 234 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813218113; 081321811X.Subject(s): English drama -- History and criticism -- Theory, etc | Rhetoric -- Moral and ethical aspects | Theater -- Philosophy | Theater audiences | Persuasion (Rhetoric) | Literature and morals | Ethics in literature | Values in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Ethos of drama.DDC classification: 822.009 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Rhetorical ethos and dramatic theory -- Syntax, style, and ethos -- The worth of words -- Memory and ethos -- Shaw, ethos, and rhetorical wit -- Athol Fugard's dramatic rhetoric -- Rhetoric and silence in Holocaust drama.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PR625 .K57 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2852cx Available ocn812915029

Includes bibliographical references (pages 223-230) and index.

Rhetorical ethos and dramatic theory -- Syntax, style, and ethos -- The worth of words -- Memory and ethos -- Shaw, ethos, and rhetorical wit -- Athol Fugard's dramatic rhetoric -- Rhetoric and silence in Holocaust drama.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Grounding drama, and viewer response to drama, in a traditional study of rhetoric, King (Elms College) "investigates how a play in performance leads an audience to accept its dramatic vision." Beginning with Shakespeare and moving through modern drama, the author invokes rhetorical theory dating back to Aristotle in an effort to evaluate moral values (ethos) in play and performance. The unique dependence of drama on audience offers interesting opportunities for rhetorical criticism, which is broadly social in its goals, and which concerns itself with people acting communally in the same way that drama does, both within the boundaries of the stage and in relating to an assembled audience beyond the stage. King argues for the continuing relevance of traditional rhetoric as critical for an appreciation of aesthetic strategy and moral worth in the plays of writers as diverse as Shakespeare, Dryden, Otway, Chekov, Shaw, O'Neill, Williams, Miller, and Stoppard. He concludes that playwrights "with a social or political vision and with a humane approach to their craft will necessarily meet their audience on a common moral ground." Written without clunky jargon, this persuasive book offers a useful tonic for overly theorized and amoral approaches to drama. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers. D. Pesta University of Wisconsin--Oshkosh

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