The most fundamental right : contrasting perspectives on the Voting Rights Act / edited by Daniel McCool.

Contributor(s): McCool, Daniel, 1950- [editor.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780253007100; 0253007100Subject(s): Suffrage -- United States -- Congresses | Minorities -- Suffrage -- United States -- CongressesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Most fundamental right.DDC classification: 342.73/072 LOC classification: KF4891 | .M67 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Meaningful votes / Daniel McCool -- The constitutional foundations of the "preclearance" process : how section 5 of the Voting Rights Act was enforced, 1965-2005 / Peyton McCrary -- Influence district and the courts : a concept in need of clarity / Richard L. Engstrom -- The Bull Connor is dead myth : or why we need strong, effectively enforced voting rights laws / Laughlin McDonald -- Bull Connor is long dead : let's move on / Abigail Thernstrom -- The Voting Rights Act in South Dakota : one litigator's perspective on reauthorization / Bryan L. Sells -- Realistic expectations : South Dakota's experience with the Voting Rights Act / Chris -- Nelson -- The continuing need for the language-assistance provisions of the Voting Rights Act / James Thomas Tucker -- Policy and constitutional objections to section 203 of the Voting Rights Act / Roger Clegg -- After NAMUDNO : the shape of future litigation / Edward Blum -- Looking backward to and forward from the 2006 Voting Rights Act reauthorization / Debo P. Adegbile.
Summary: Passed in 1965 during the height of the Civil Rights movement, the Voting Rights Act (VRA) changed the face of the American electorate, dramatically increasing minority voting, especially in the South. While portions of the Act are permanent, certain provisions were set to expire in 2007. Reauthorization of these provisions passed by a wide margin in the House, and unanimously in the Senate, but the lopsided tally hid a deep and growing conflict. The Most Fundamental Right is an effort to understand the debate over the Act and its role in contemporary American democracy. Is the VRA the cornerstone of civil rights law that prevents unfair voting practices, or is it an anachronism that no longer serves American democracy? Divided into three sections, the book utilizes a point/counterpoint approach. Section 1 explains the legal and political context of the Act, providing important background for what follows; Section 2 pairs three debates concerning specific provisions or applications of the Act; while Section 3 offers commentaries on the previous chapters from attorneys with widely divergent viewpoints.
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KF4891 .M67 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt16gh641 Available ocn813418433

"The initial impetus for this book was a forum on voting rights at the University of Utah in 2006."

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Meaningful votes / Daniel McCool -- The constitutional foundations of the "preclearance" process : how section 5 of the Voting Rights Act was enforced, 1965-2005 / Peyton McCrary -- Influence district and the courts : a concept in need of clarity / Richard L. Engstrom -- The Bull Connor is dead myth : or why we need strong, effectively enforced voting rights laws / Laughlin McDonald -- Bull Connor is long dead : let's move on / Abigail Thernstrom -- The Voting Rights Act in South Dakota : one litigator's perspective on reauthorization / Bryan L. Sells -- Realistic expectations : South Dakota's experience with the Voting Rights Act / Chris -- Nelson -- The continuing need for the language-assistance provisions of the Voting Rights Act / James Thomas Tucker -- Policy and constitutional objections to section 203 of the Voting Rights Act / Roger Clegg -- After NAMUDNO : the shape of future litigation / Edward Blum -- Looking backward to and forward from the 2006 Voting Rights Act reauthorization / Debo P. Adegbile.

Passed in 1965 during the height of the Civil Rights movement, the Voting Rights Act (VRA) changed the face of the American electorate, dramatically increasing minority voting, especially in the South. While portions of the Act are permanent, certain provisions were set to expire in 2007. Reauthorization of these provisions passed by a wide margin in the House, and unanimously in the Senate, but the lopsided tally hid a deep and growing conflict. The Most Fundamental Right is an effort to understand the debate over the Act and its role in contemporary American democracy. Is the VRA the cornerstone of civil rights law that prevents unfair voting practices, or is it an anachronism that no longer serves American democracy? Divided into three sections, the book utilizes a point/counterpoint approach. Section 1 explains the legal and political context of the Act, providing important background for what follows; Section 2 pairs three debates concerning specific provisions or applications of the Act; while Section 3 offers commentaries on the previous chapters from attorneys with widely divergent viewpoints.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The 1965 Voting Rights Act (VRA) was a landmark piece of federal legislation that has successfully enhanced the voting rights of racial minorities across the US and especially in the South, which had a history of voter discrimination. While the Supreme Court has upheld the constitutionality of the VRA, many assert that the law has outlived its need, minority voting rights are secure, and Section 5 is now unconstitutional. Section 5 requires many jurisdictions to get preclearance from the Department of Justice if they wish to make changes to their voting laws. Examining the continuing need of the VRA is the subject of this volume in anticipation of the Supreme Court revisiting Section 5's constitutionality. The essays in the book traverse contrasting legal and political perspectives regarding the constitutionality of Section 5. McCool (Univ. of Utah), the volume's editor, pens an introduction that provides a concise overview of the VRA and the debates over Section 5, with subsequent contributors providing unique perspectives on the VRA's application in the South and in states across the country, including even South Dakota. Excellent for collections on civil rights, voting rights, US politics, and constitutional law. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. D. Schultz Hamline University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Daniel McCool is Professor of Political Science at the University of Utah and author (with Susan Olson and Jennifer Robinson) of Native Vote: American Indians, the Voting Rights Act, and the Right to Vote.

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