Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Thieves of Virtue : When Bioethics Stole Medicine / Tom Koch.

By: Koch, Tom, 1949-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Basic bioethics: Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780262305532; 0262305534; 9780262304603; 0262304600.Subject(s): Bioethics -- History | Bioethics -- Political aspects | Bioethics -- Philosophy | Medical ethics -- Political aspects | Medical ethics -- Philosophy | Electronic booksAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 174.2 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Dead Germans and other philosophers: ethics as a professional or public occupation -- Something old: a brief review -- Something newer: supply-side ethics -- Lifeboat ethics: scarcity as an unnatural state -- Biopolitics, biophilosophies, and bioethics -- Principles of biomedical ethics -- Bioethics and conformal humans -- Research and genetics: "for the benefit of humankind" -- Choice, freedom, and the paternalism thing -- Complex ethics: toward an ethics of medicine.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QH332 .K63 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5hhhkg Available ocn813528848

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Dead Germans and other philosophers: ethics as a professional or public occupation -- Something old: a brief review -- Something newer: supply-side ethics -- Lifeboat ethics: scarcity as an unnatural state -- Biopolitics, biophilosophies, and bioethics -- Principles of biomedical ethics -- Bioethics and conformal humans -- Research and genetics: "for the benefit of humankind" -- Choice, freedom, and the paternalism thing -- Complex ethics: toward an ethics of medicine.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This insightful but at times overly polemical book is a scathing critique of contemporary bioethics since the 1960s. Koch (Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground) claims that, prior to the rise of bioethics as a discipline, doctor-patient relationships were governed only by a concern for the patient's well-being. Now economic and social factors are brought into play, such as "the myth of scarcity," which, he claims, creates situations in which social concerns trump the needs of the individual. He argues, perhaps with some merit, that anxieties about the scarcity of medical care exist only because the United States has created a system that does not allocate the necessary funds for adequate health care. While Koch sometimes reads his opponents uncharitably and seems to simplify their positions to fit his critique of them, he makes valid, thoughtful points. -VERDICT Despite his controversial tone and arguably unfair readings of those he considers his opponents, Koch raises important questions that bioethics and health policy scholars (his intended audience) would do well to attend to.-Aaron Klink, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Koch (independent scholar), author of Cartographies of Disease (CH, Mar'06, 43-4058), writes a scathing indictment of contemporary bioethics. He argues that bioethics went astray when its focus shifted from providing for the needs of particular patients to thinking about medical decision making in the context of the allocation of supposedly scarce resources. Koch argues that Americans have the means to provide adequate care if the country chooses to allocate more resources to health care, but he fails to show why such a shift, at the cost of other social goods, is justified. At the same time, while his call for a bioethics concerned primarily with patients' needs--not with philosophical principles--is noble, it ignores the structural realities, sometimes more complex than the book admits, that lead to bioethics in the first place. Despite the book's many interesting and valuable points, its tendency toward hyperbole and overstatement and refusal to charitably construe opposing arguments detracts from its persuasiveness. Still, students of medical ethics and clinical ethicists will find it thought provoking, even if they disagree with its methods and conclusions. Medical school libraries and those with graduate programs in ethics will find this a useful addition. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. W. Klink Duke University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.