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Plotting Justice : Narrative Ethics and Literary Culture After 9/11.

By: Banita, Georgiana.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lincoln : UNP - Nebraska, 2012Description: 1 online resource (375 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780803244610; 0803244614.Subject(s): Ethics in literature | Psychoanalysis in literature | Social change in literature | Literature and morals | Literature and society -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 813.6093587393 | 813/.6093587393 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: New Ethics, New Literatures, New Americas; 1. Falling Man Fiction: DeLillo, Spiegelman, Schulman, and the Spectatorial Condition; 2. Sex and Sense: McGrath, Tristram, and Psychoanalysis from Ground Zero toAbu Ghraib; 3. Moral Crusades: Race, Risk, and Walt Whitman's Afterlives; 4. The Internationalization of Conscience: Hemon, Barker, Balkanism; 5. Reading for the Pattern: Narrative, Data Mining, and the Transnational Ethics of Surveillance; Conclusion: Postincendiary Circumstances; Notes; Bibliography; Index.
Summary: Have the terrorist attacks of September 11 shifted the moral coordinates of contemporary fiction? And how might such a shift, reflected in narrative strategies and forms, relate to other themes and trends emerging with the globalization of literature? This book pursues these questions through works written in the wake of 9/11 and examines the complex intersection of ethics and narrative that has defined a significant portion of British and American fiction over the past decade. Don DeLillo, Pat Barker, Aleksandar Hemon, Lorraine Adams, Michael Cunningham, and Patrick McGrath are among the autho.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS374.S445 B36 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d9nqhz Available ocn815388522

Print version record.

Have the terrorist attacks of September 11 shifted the moral coordinates of contemporary fiction? And how might such a shift, reflected in narrative strategies and forms, relate to other themes and trends emerging with the globalization of literature? This book pursues these questions through works written in the wake of 9/11 and examines the complex intersection of ethics and narrative that has defined a significant portion of British and American fiction over the past decade. Don DeLillo, Pat Barker, Aleksandar Hemon, Lorraine Adams, Michael Cunningham, and Patrick McGrath are among the autho.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: New Ethics, New Literatures, New Americas; 1. Falling Man Fiction: DeLillo, Spiegelman, Schulman, and the Spectatorial Condition; 2. Sex and Sense: McGrath, Tristram, and Psychoanalysis from Ground Zero toAbu Ghraib; 3. Moral Crusades: Race, Risk, and Walt Whitman's Afterlives; 4. The Internationalization of Conscience: Hemon, Barker, Balkanism; 5. Reading for the Pattern: Narrative, Data Mining, and the Transnational Ethics of Surveillance; Conclusion: Postincendiary Circumstances; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Part narrative theory, part ethical analysis, this book offers a well-written conceptual examination of the juncture between fiction and morality in the literature written in the wake of 9/11. Banita (literature and media studies, Univ. of Sydney, Australia) weaves a complex network of moral topology, historicism, literary ethics, Otherness, and transnationalism in this comprehensive study of 20 works of fiction that were fundamentally influenced in the creative process by the shared cultural memory of 9/11 and the forces tied to it: two wars, human-rights abuses, the financial crash of 2008. The author widens the theoretical field through which to examine post-9/11 literature; she looks beyond close reading and asks complex questions about narrative form. Banita examines everything from literary anxiety to established ethical norms to narrative inertia to the rhetoric of East-versus-West, right-versus-wrong, us-versus-them dichotomies. She also examines the provocative narrative ambiguity that seems to embrace a particular sense of provisionality rather than clear-cut morals. In the end, she identifies more questions than answers about what she uncovers, which says something significant about the unsettled, emerging nature of the field. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers/faculty. E. T. Mason College of Mount St. Joseph

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Georgiana Banita is an assistant professor of North American literature and media at the University of Bamberg and Honorary Research Fellow at the United States Studies Centre, University of Sydney.

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