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In the shadow of the greatest generation : the Americans who fought the Korean War / Melinda L. Pash.

By: Pash, Melinda L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (xii, 337 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0814789226; 9780814789223; 9780814760673; 0814760678.Other title: Americans who fought the Korean War.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 951.904/240973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Timing is everything -- Mustering in -- You're in the Army (or Navy, Marines, or Air Force) now! -- In country in Korea, a war like any other? -- Behind enemy lines -- Our fight? : gender, race, and the war zone -- Coming home -- More than ever a veteran.
Summary: "In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation traces the shared experiences of Korean War veterans from their childhoods in the Great Depression and World War II through military induction and training, the war, and efforts in more recent decades to organize and gain wider recognition of their service. Largely overshadowed by World War II's "greatest generation" and the more vocal veterans of the Vietnam era, Korean War veterans remain relatively invisible in the narratives of both war and its aftermath. Yet, just as the beaches of Normandy and the jungles of Vietnam worked profound changes on conflict participants, the Korean Peninsula chipped away at the beliefs, physical and mental well-being, and fortitude of Americans completing wartime tours of duty there. Upon returning home, Korean War veterans struggled with home front attitudes toward the war, faced employment and family dilemmas, and wrestled with readjustment. Not unlike other wars, Korea proved a formative and defining influence on the men and women stationed in theater, on their loved ones, and in some measure on American culture. In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation not only gives voice to those Americans who served in the "forgotten war" but chronicles the larger personal and collective consequences of waging war the American way."--Project Muse.
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DS919 .P38 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qfgfx Available ocn817560302
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DS918.2.I49 M33 2013 The Imjin and Kapyong battles, Korea, 1951 / DS918.8 -- .S5413 2012 Mao, Stalin and the Korean War : DS919 .B69 2015 The Line : DS919 .P38 2012 In the shadow of the greatest generation : DS919 .S775 2010 Striking back : DS919.3 Britain's Korean war : DS919.5 .L536 2014 China''s Battle for Korea :

Timing is everything -- Mustering in -- You're in the Army (or Navy, Marines, or Air Force) now! -- In country in Korea, a war like any other? -- Behind enemy lines -- Our fight? : gender, race, and the war zone -- Coming home -- More than ever a veteran.

"In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation traces the shared experiences of Korean War veterans from their childhoods in the Great Depression and World War II through military induction and training, the war, and efforts in more recent decades to organize and gain wider recognition of their service. Largely overshadowed by World War II's "greatest generation" and the more vocal veterans of the Vietnam era, Korean War veterans remain relatively invisible in the narratives of both war and its aftermath. Yet, just as the beaches of Normandy and the jungles of Vietnam worked profound changes on conflict participants, the Korean Peninsula chipped away at the beliefs, physical and mental well-being, and fortitude of Americans completing wartime tours of duty there. Upon returning home, Korean War veterans struggled with home front attitudes toward the war, faced employment and family dilemmas, and wrestled with readjustment. Not unlike other wars, Korea proved a formative and defining influence on the men and women stationed in theater, on their loved ones, and in some measure on American culture. In the Shadow of the Greatest Generation not only gives voice to those Americans who served in the "forgotten war" but chronicles the larger personal and collective consequences of waging war the American way."--Project Muse.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The Korean War is often referred to as the "Forgotten War." Pash (history, Fayetteville Technical Community Coll.) describes the lives of Korean War veterans before, during, and after the war, examining the reasons they enlisted, their range of experiences, and the consequences of their service upon their lives. Her main argument is that the Great Depression and World War II created a culture among young Americans that prepared them to accept the sacrifices demanded of them during the Korean conflict. The author is particularly thorough in her examination of socioeconomic, gender, and race issues. -VERDICT Although Pash doesn't make a strong case for her thesis on the influences upon these veterans, she presents fine descriptive analysis that's especially strong when discussing veterans' experiences during and after the war. Recommended for those with an interest in the war and its human dimensions, or for those new to the subject.-CH (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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