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Spying in America : espionage from the Revolutionary War to the dawn of the Cold War / Michael J. Sulick.

By: Sulick, Michael J [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 320 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 158901927X; 9781589019270; 9781626160668; 162616066X.Subject(s): Espionage -- United States -- Case studies | Espionage -- United States -- History | Spies -- United States -- Biography | Spies -- United States -- History | Military intelligence -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Spying in America.DDC classification: 327.120973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: the peril of disbelief -- The Revolutionary War -- The Civil War -- Espionage during the World Wars, 1914-45 -- The golden age of Soviet espionage : the 1930s and 1940s -- The atomic bomb spies : prelude to the Cold War -- Conclusion: espionage in the Cold War and beyond.
Summary: Can you keep a secret? Maybe you can, but the United States government cannot. Since the birth of the country, nations large and small, from Russia and China to Ghana and Ecuador, have stolen the most precious secrets of the United States. Written by Michael Sulick, former director of CIA's clandestine service, Spying in America presents a history of more than thirty espionage cases inside the United States. These cases include Americans who spied against their country, spies from both the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War, and foreign agents who ran operations on American soil. Some of the stories are familiar, such as those of Benedict Arnold and Julius Rosenberg, while others, though less well known, are equally fascinating. From the American Revolution, through the Civil War and two World Wars, to the atomic age of the Manhattan Project, Sulick details the lives of those who have betrayed America's secrets. In each case he focuses on the motivations that drove these individuals to spy, their access and the secrets they betrayed, their tradecraft or techniques for concealing their espionage, their exposure and punishment, and the damage they ultimately inflicted on America's national security. Spying in America serves as the perfect introduction to the early history of espionage in America. Sulick's unique experience as a senior intelligence officer is evident as he skillfully guides the reader through these cases of intrigue, deftly illustrating the evolution of American awareness about espionage and the fitful development of American counterespionage leading up to the Cold War.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
UB271.U5 S85 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fgtvh Available ocn821265703

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: the peril of disbelief -- The Revolutionary War -- The Civil War -- Espionage during the World Wars, 1914-45 -- The golden age of Soviet espionage : the 1930s and 1940s -- The atomic bomb spies : prelude to the Cold War -- Conclusion: espionage in the Cold War and beyond.

Print version record.

Can you keep a secret? Maybe you can, but the United States government cannot. Since the birth of the country, nations large and small, from Russia and China to Ghana and Ecuador, have stolen the most precious secrets of the United States. Written by Michael Sulick, former director of CIA's clandestine service, Spying in America presents a history of more than thirty espionage cases inside the United States. These cases include Americans who spied against their country, spies from both the Union and Confederacy during the Civil War, and foreign agents who ran operations on American soil. Some of the stories are familiar, such as those of Benedict Arnold and Julius Rosenberg, while others, though less well known, are equally fascinating. From the American Revolution, through the Civil War and two World Wars, to the atomic age of the Manhattan Project, Sulick details the lives of those who have betrayed America's secrets. In each case he focuses on the motivations that drove these individuals to spy, their access and the secrets they betrayed, their tradecraft or techniques for concealing their espionage, their exposure and punishment, and the damage they ultimately inflicted on America's national security. Spying in America serves as the perfect introduction to the early history of espionage in America. Sulick's unique experience as a senior intelligence officer is evident as he skillfully guides the reader through these cases of intrigue, deftly illustrating the evolution of American awareness about espionage and the fitful development of American counterespionage leading up to the Cold War.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Recognizing a gap in the subject literature, Sulick, a 28-year veteran of the CIA, including years overseeing its clandestine and counterintelligence departments, has written an informative collection of case studies, rather than a narrative history, reviewing some of the most important espionage activities against the United States and within its borders. He highlights the tradecraft of the spies, their access to secret information, American bureaucratic turf wars, and (in many cases very belated) counterespionage efforts. He assesses in each case what damage was done to the country. What is most interesting are the motivations of citizens to betray their own country in contrast to those sent here to spy on us. This work is well documented with a wide variety of open source books, articles, government publications, and online reports. A minor quibble is that a chronology would have been helpful. The book covers espionage from the Revolution through the Cold War, with limited coverage of recent years. The author certainly knows the subject inside and out. Verdict While the experts know all about these cases, this is an easy-to-read introduction for interested laypersons or those taking beginning courses on the history of intelligence operations.-Daniel Blewett, Coll. of DuPage Lib., Glen Ellyn, IL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Recently, the media has exposed a wave of cyber espionage directed against the Pentagon and other government institutions. Yet scholars often overlook conventional espionage, though it has played a significant role in US history. Sulick, the former chief of the CIA's counterintelligence branch, has written a remarkable account of those who betrayed their country and those who sought to apprehend them. The study is a primer focusing solely on spies and how they were uncovered, from Benjamin Church through the Rosenbergs, including some, like George Koval, a Soviet illegal, who managed to avoid detection by the FBI until the Russians publicly acknowledged his efforts in 2007. The 1930s and 1940s were the heyday of Soviet intelligence operations in the US. While the FBI was concentrating on Axis agents, Soviet intelligence was reaping the rewards of long-term assets placed in the State and Treasury Departments, the FBI, and even the White House. Only by breaking the Soviet NKVD code and obtaining the testimony of defectors did the FBI realize the threat posed by the Soviets to US security. A vital addition to academic libraries as well as for readers interested in the early Cold War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. C. C. Lovett Emporia State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Michael J. Sulick is a retired intelligence operations officer who worked for the CIA for twenty-eight years. He served as chief of CIA counterintelligence from 2002-4 and as director of the National Clandestine Service from 2007-10, where he was responsible for supervising the agency's covert collection operations and coordinating the espionage activities of the US intelligence community.</p>

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