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Go west, young women! : the rise of early Hollywood / Hilary A. Hallett.

By: Hallett, Hilary A, 1968-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0520953681; 9780520953680.Subject(s): Motion picture actors and actresses -- California -- Los Angeles | Motion pictures and women -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 791.43/6522 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Along the road to Hollywood: landscapes "in motion-picture land". "Oh for a girl who could ride a horse like pearl white": the actress democratizes fame -- Women-made women: writing the "movies" before Hollywood -- Melodramas of Hollywood's birth: the postwar revolution in morals and manners, redux. Hollywood bohemia -- The movie menace -- A star is born: rereading Hollywood's first sex scandal -- Conclusion: the girl from Hollywood.
Abstract: "In the early part of the twentieth century, migrants made their way from rural homes to cities in record numbers and many traveled west. Los Angeles became a destination. Women flocked to the growing town to join the film industry as workers and spectators, creating a "New Woman." Their efforts transformed filmmaking from a marginal business to a cosmopolitan, glamorous, and bohemian one. By 1920, Los Angeles had become the only western city where women outnumbered men. In Go West, Young Women, Hilary A. Hallett explores these relatively unknown new western women and their role in the development of Los Angeles and the nascent film industry. From Mary Pickford's rise to become perhaps the most powerful woman of her age, to the racist moral panics of the post-World War I years that culminated in Hollywood's first sex scandal, Hallett describes how the path through early Hollywood presaged the struggles over modern gender roles that animated the century to come."-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PN1995.9.W6 H23 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt24hsmb Available ocn825170139

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Includes filmography.

Along the road to Hollywood: landscapes "in motion-picture land". "Oh for a girl who could ride a horse like pearl white": the actress democratizes fame -- Women-made women: writing the "movies" before Hollywood -- Melodramas of Hollywood's birth: the postwar revolution in morals and manners, redux. Hollywood bohemia -- The movie menace -- A star is born: rereading Hollywood's first sex scandal -- Conclusion: the girl from Hollywood.

"In the early part of the twentieth century, migrants made their way from rural homes to cities in record numbers and many traveled west. Los Angeles became a destination. Women flocked to the growing town to join the film industry as workers and spectators, creating a "New Woman." Their efforts transformed filmmaking from a marginal business to a cosmopolitan, glamorous, and bohemian one. By 1920, Los Angeles had become the only western city where women outnumbered men. In Go West, Young Women, Hilary A. Hallett explores these relatively unknown new western women and their role in the development of Los Angeles and the nascent film industry. From Mary Pickford's rise to become perhaps the most powerful woman of her age, to the racist moral panics of the post-World War I years that culminated in Hollywood's first sex scandal, Hallett describes how the path through early Hollywood presaged the struggles over modern gender roles that animated the century to come."-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Though a lot of this book explores previously mined territory, Hallett (history, Columbia) does a solid job in researching and bringing to life the often-marginalized women who worked in the early days of Hollywood. She concentrates, for the most part, on the women in front of the camera rather than those on the production end. The women directors are here, but they are not the central figures. Hallett focuses on the women who became stars, and even offers a re-reading of the infamous Fatty Arbuckle/Virginia Rappe scandal, which effectively ended Arbuckle's career. She also examines numerous women who wrote the screenplays for early Hollywood films, and documents how many of them moved on from scripting to directing, a natural progression that still works today. And she considers the exoticism that typified Hollywood's early "vamps"--women like Pola Negri and the now-forgotten Elinor Glyn, whose "hot" novels were translated to the screen as popular entertainment. Illustrated with a generous selection of stills, this is a lively look at Hollywood's past, when the movies were still in their infancy, and at the women who were a critical part of it. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. G. A. Foster University of Nebraska--Lincoln

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