Word by word : emancipation and the act of writing / Christopher Hager.

By: Hager, Christopher, 1974-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (311 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674067486; 0674067487Subject(s): American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | African American authors -- Political and social views | Literature and society -- United States | African Americans -- Civil rights | African Americans in literature | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Word by word.DDC classification: 810.9/896073075 LOC classification: PS153.N5 | H17 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Black Literacy in the White Mind -- The Private Life of the Literate Slave -- Writing a Life in Slavery and Freedom -- The Written We -- Petition and Protest in the Occupied South -- Black Ink, White Pages.
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PS153.N5 H17 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt2jbq7m Available ocn827235538

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Black Literacy in the White Mind -- The Private Life of the Literate Slave -- Writing a Life in Slavery and Freedom -- The Written We -- Petition and Protest in the Occupied South -- Black Ink, White Pages.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hager (Trinity College) provides an informed and informative view of writings produced by formerly enslaved African Americans, often overlooked as an illiterate group. Hager reminds readers to attend to those texts that have the power to give scholars a broader perspective of particular moments. These documents exist mostly in the form of letters (and some diaries and petitions), but most are not lengthy enough to be classified as slave narratives. They have nevertheless "generated a written record of the experience of emancipation," as Hager makes clear in the introduction. While their names are often unknown or not well known, these authors' inclusion in this scholarly study meets Hager's stated goal of broadening literary studies beyond printed works to include manuscripts produced by "marginally literate writers in addition to the well-educated." By paying attention to these authors, Hager aims to develop new models for the interpretation of historical sources and give voice to both the unknown and the underappreciated. Summing up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. T. T. Green University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christopher Hager is Assistant Professor of English and American Studies at Trinity College, Hartford.

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