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Development, security, and aid : geopolitics and geoeconomics at the U.S. Agency for International Development / Jamey Essex.

By: Essex, Jamey, 1977-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Geographies of justice and social transformation: Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, ©2013Description: 1 online resource (xi, 183 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820345673; 0820345679.Subject(s): Economic assistance, American | Geopolitics | Economic geographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Development, security, and aid.DDC classification: 338.91/73 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
"One-half of 1%": geopolitics, geoeconomics, and USAID -- "In the world for keeps": from the Marshall Plan to the Vietnam War -- Geoeconomics ascendant: development, interdependence, and neoliberalization -- Two decades of neoliberalization: from the Cold war to the War on Terror -- Development in reverse: crisis, austerity, and the future of USAID.
Summary: "In Development, Security, and Aid Jamey Essex offers a sophisticated study of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), examining the separate but intertwined discourses of geopolitics and geoeconomics. Geopolitics concentrates on territory, borders, and strategic political and military positioning within the international state system. Geoeconomics emphasizes economic power, growth, and connectedness within a global, and supposedly borderless, system. Both discourses have strongly influenced the strategies of USAID and the views of American policy makers, bureaucrats, and business leaders toward international development. Providing a unique geographical analysis of American development policy, Essex details USAID's establishment in 1961 and traces the agency's growth from the Cold War into an era of neoliberal globalization up to and beyond 9/11, the global war on terror, and the looming age of austerity. USAID promotes improvement for millions by providing emergency assistance and support for long-term economic and social development. Yet the agency's humanitarian efforts are strongly influenced, and often trumped, by its mandate to advance American foreign policies. As a site of, a strategy for, and an agent in the making of geopolitics and geoeconomics, USAID, Essex argues, has often struggled to reconcile its many institutional mandates and objectives. The agency has always occupied a precarious political position, one that is increasingly marked by the strong influence of military, corporate, and foreign-policy institutions in American development strategy."--Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HC60 .E736 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt46nmhr Available ocn827336862

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"One-half of 1%": geopolitics, geoeconomics, and USAID -- "In the world for keeps": from the Marshall Plan to the Vietnam War -- Geoeconomics ascendant: development, interdependence, and neoliberalization -- Two decades of neoliberalization: from the Cold war to the War on Terror -- Development in reverse: crisis, austerity, and the future of USAID.

"In Development, Security, and Aid Jamey Essex offers a sophisticated study of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), examining the separate but intertwined discourses of geopolitics and geoeconomics. Geopolitics concentrates on territory, borders, and strategic political and military positioning within the international state system. Geoeconomics emphasizes economic power, growth, and connectedness within a global, and supposedly borderless, system. Both discourses have strongly influenced the strategies of USAID and the views of American policy makers, bureaucrats, and business leaders toward international development. Providing a unique geographical analysis of American development policy, Essex details USAID's establishment in 1961 and traces the agency's growth from the Cold War into an era of neoliberal globalization up to and beyond 9/11, the global war on terror, and the looming age of austerity. USAID promotes improvement for millions by providing emergency assistance and support for long-term economic and social development. Yet the agency's humanitarian efforts are strongly influenced, and often trumped, by its mandate to advance American foreign policies. As a site of, a strategy for, and an agent in the making of geopolitics and geoeconomics, USAID, Essex argues, has often struggled to reconcile its many institutional mandates and objectives. The agency has always occupied a precarious political position, one that is increasingly marked by the strong influence of military, corporate, and foreign-policy institutions in American development strategy."--Publisher's website.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Scholars from many fields study aid institutions. Frequently, their books include an introductory chapter heavy in discipline-specific language and theory. Then, having situated the topic in the field of study, they turn to in-depth exploration of the institution with only occasional reference back to the original framing exercise. One advantage of this approach is that scholars from other disciplines can benefit substantially from the historical and institutional detail laid out in later chapters. Development, Security, and Aid departs from this pattern, with the language and analytical lens of radical geography and constructivist international relations permeating the text. The book examines the history of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) from its inception through the War on Terror, largely focusing on high-level analysis based on agency and congressional policy documents rather than the details of the organization's structure, funding, or operations. Essex (Univ. of Windsor, Canada) explores the interplay of the sometimes competing influences of geopolitics and "geoeconomics" (here reflecting the US government's focus on spreading neoliberal economic policies) in shaping USAID's role and standing in the US government and how it has changed over time. Summing Up: Recommended. Research and faculty collections. C. Kilby Villanova University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

JAMEY ESSEX is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Windsor.

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