Be it ever so humble : poverty, fiction, and the invention of the middle-class home / Scott R. MacKenzie.

By: MacKenzie, Scott R, 1969-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Winner of the Walker Cowen Memorial PrizePublisher: Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2013Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813933429; 0813933420Other title: Poverty, fiction, and the invention of the middle-class homeSubject(s): Home in literature | Middle class in literature | Nationalism in literature | Poverty -- Government policy -- England | English literature -- Scottish authors -- History and criticismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Be it ever so humble.DDC classification: 823/.6093564 LOC classification: PR858.H65 | .M33 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: There's no case like home -- "Stock the parish with beauties": Henry Fielding's parochial vision -- An Englishwoman's workhouse is her castle: poverty management and the Radcliffean gothic -- Home and away: hegemony and naturalization -- There's no home-like place: out of doors in Scotland -- Conclusion: this home is not a house.
Awards: Winner of the Walker Cowen Memorial Prize.
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Winner of the Walker Cowen Memorial Prize.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: There's no case like home -- "Stock the parish with beauties": Henry Fielding's parochial vision -- An Englishwoman's workhouse is her castle: poverty management and the Radcliffean gothic -- Home and away: hegemony and naturalization -- There's no home-like place: out of doors in Scotland -- Conclusion: this home is not a house.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This erudite book combines the theoretical schools of Foucault and Gramsci to explain the emergence of the concept of "home" as a response to the poor and the laboring classes. Through engagement with works by Henry Fielding, Ann Radcliffe, Maria Edgeworth, John Galt, Elizabeth Hamilton, Walter Scott, Jane Austen, Frances Burney, James Hogg, and others, MacKenzie (Univ. of British Columbia) demonstrates the evolution of a complex idea linking home, nation, and self in ways that reverberate in today's public and private spaces. MacKenzie's argument is valuable for the manner in which it demonstrates that 19th-century middle-class appropriation of the ideal of home and family is rooted in the 18th-century response to poverty and vagrancy. MacKenzie looks at the manner in which parish paternalism of 18th-century England evolved into the ideal of the British family home. MacKenzie's deconstructive analysis of this ideal in terms of its regulatory function is particularly compelling. Clearly written and carefully researched, this book makes an important and transformative argument. Through a lens trained on the image of "home," MacKenzie elaborates the relationship between novels and writers not usually placed in conversation with one another. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. E. Kraft University of Georgia

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Scott R. MacKenzie is Assistant Professor of English at the University of British Columbia.

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