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Upon provincialism : southern literature and national periodical culture, 1870-1900 / Bill Hardwig.

By: Hardwig, Bill.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813934068; 0813934060.Subject(s): American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticism | Multiculturalism in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Upon provincialism.DDC classification: 810.9/975 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The creative potency of hunger: travel writing, local color, and the charting of the postwar South -- Unveiling the body: literary reception and the outing of Charles W. Chesnutt and Mary N. Murfree -- On the fringes: local color's haunting of the unified South -- Wooing the muse of the odd: New Orleans at the gate of the tropics.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS261 .H24 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wrkxm Available ocn834143942

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The creative potency of hunger: travel writing, local color, and the charting of the postwar South -- Unveiling the body: literary reception and the outing of Charles W. Chesnutt and Mary N. Murfree -- On the fringes: local color's haunting of the unified South -- Wooing the muse of the odd: New Orleans at the gate of the tropics.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Those interested in subtleties of "local color" literature may welcome this study, which, according to Hardwig (Univ. of Tennessee), "contributes to the demythologizing of southern culture by resisting the conventional narratives of a defeated, provincial, and insular South." Hardwig's discussions of Thomas Nelson Page, Mark Twain, Charles Chesnutt, Mary N. Murfree, Lafcadio Hearn, Grace King, and Alice Dunbar-Nelson present selected information aimed at showing how "the trope of the outside traveler visiting a foreign South became the central means of bridging the imaginative gap between the national audience and the local subject matter." The book's illustrations include six woodcuts by Hearn and five advertisements from A. M. Meeker's Eliza Ross: or, Illustrated Guide of Lookout Mountain. One of the book's problems is that the main message is diluted by numerous declarations as to what the book itself is going to say next, what it has just said, or even what it is saying at the point being read. Add to this a tacked-on epilogue, the content of which seems generally unrelated to preceding material, and one cannot but conclude that Hardwig's evident desire to clarify his intention has not been well served. Though interesting points are raised, their presentation often obscures their effect. Summing Up: Not recommended. R. W. Haynes Texas A&M International University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Bill Hardwig is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Tennessee.</p>

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