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From coveralls to zoot suits : the lives of Mexican American women on the World War II home front / Elizabeth R. Escobedo.

By: Escobedo, Elizabeth Rachel.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2013Description: 1 online resource (229 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1469602067; 9781469602066; 9781469608242; 1469608243.Subject(s): Mexican American women -- Employment -- California -- Los Angeles -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 305.8968/72073079494 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The Pachuca panic -- Americanos todos : Mexican Women and the wartime state and media -- Reenvisioning Rosie : Mexican Women and wartime defense work -- Respectable rebellions : Mexican women and the world of wartime leisure -- Rights and postwar life.
Summary: During World War II, unprecedented employment avenues opened up for women and minorities in U.S. defense industries at the same time that massive population shifts and the war challenged Americans to rethink notions of race. At this extraordinary historical moment, Mexican American women found new means to exercise control over their lives in the home, workplace, and nation. In From Coveralls to Zoot Suits, Elizabeth R. Escobedo explores how, as war workers and volunteers, dance hostesses and zoot suiters, respectable young ladies and rebellious daughters, these young women used wartime conditions to serve the United States in its time of need and to pursue their own desires. But even after the war, as Escobedo shows, Mexican American women had to continue challenging workplace inequities and confronting family and communal resistance to their broadening public presence.  Highlighting seldom heard voices of the "Greatest Generation," Escobedo examines these contradictions within Mexican families and their communities, exploring the impact of youth culture, outside employment, and family relations on the lives of women whose home-front experiences and everyday life choices would fundamentally alter the history of a generation.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F869.L89 M5156 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469602066_escobedo Available ocn841229543

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

The Pachuca panic -- Americanos todos : Mexican Women and the wartime state and media -- Reenvisioning Rosie : Mexican Women and wartime defense work -- Respectable rebellions : Mexican women and the world of wartime leisure -- Rights and postwar life.

During World War II, unprecedented employment avenues opened up for women and minorities in U.S. defense industries at the same time that massive population shifts and the war challenged Americans to rethink notions of race. At this extraordinary historical moment, Mexican American women found new means to exercise control over their lives in the home, workplace, and nation. In From Coveralls to Zoot Suits, Elizabeth R. Escobedo explores how, as war workers and volunteers, dance hostesses and zoot suiters, respectable young ladies and rebellious daughters, these young women used wartime conditions to serve the United States in its time of need and to pursue their own desires. But even after the war, as Escobedo shows, Mexican American women had to continue challenging workplace inequities and confronting family and communal resistance to their broadening public presence.  Highlighting seldom heard voices of the "Greatest Generation," Escobedo examines these contradictions within Mexican families and their communities, exploring the impact of youth culture, outside employment, and family relations on the lives of women whose home-front experiences and everyday life choices would fundamentally alter the history of a generation.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Escobedo (Univ. of Denver) has published a superbly researched and written book on Mexican American women during and after WW II. She draws heavily on oral histories and archival documents, and her use of photographs from the Los Angeles Public Library makes for an attractive presentation. Especially strong is her critique of media stereotypes of young Mexican American women. The integration of statistical data adds to her narrative, and, unlike many other scholars, she does not drown in her thesis of how the war transformed women. This is also true of her balanced treatment of the Pachuca, which complements her stories of how well-paying jobs offered opportunities. Despite these strengths, there are epistemological problems. Like many of the younger generation of scholars, Escobedo does not know the complexities of wartime Los Angeles and makes assumptions based on other scholars who know less about the city. For instance, the Sleepy Lagoon incident started in South Central Los Angeles, and Escobedo makes only one reference to the area. Although discrimination was widespread, there were also class differences, often determined by whether a person went to a parochial or a public school. An inclusion of Los Angeles as a place would have added to the narrative. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. R. Acuna emeritus, California State University, Northridge

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