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Women's work : nationalism and contemporary African American women's novels / Courtney Thorsson.

By: Thorsson, Courtney, 1978-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813934495; 0813934494.Subject(s): American fiction -- African American authors -- History and criticism | American fiction -- Women authors -- History and criticism | African American women in literature | National characteristics, American, in literature | African American women -- Employment -- In literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Women's work.DDC classification: 813.009/896073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Organizing her nation:Toni Cade Bambara's The salt eaters -- Cooking up a nation: Ntozake Shange's Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo -- Dancing up a nation: Paule Marshall's Praisesong for the widow -- Mapping and moving nation: Gloria Naylor's Mama day -- Inscribing community: Toni Morrison's Paradise.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS374.N4 T49 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wrn5w Available ocn841810165

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Organizing her nation:Toni Cade Bambara's The salt eaters -- Cooking up a nation: Ntozake Shange's Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo -- Dancing up a nation: Paule Marshall's Praisesong for the widow -- Mapping and moving nation: Gloria Naylor's Mama day -- Inscribing community: Toni Morrison's Paradise.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this engaging and persuasive study, Thorsson (Univ. of Oregon) contends that a group of African American women novelists--including Toni Cade Bambara, Ntozake Shange, Paule Marshall, Gloria Naylor, and Toni Morrison, all of whom she refers to as cultural nationalists--produced texts in the final two decades of the 20th century that serve as a response to the marginalization of women during the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s-70s. Using fiction rather than the common BAM genres of poetry and drama, these writers reclaimed and revised notions of cultural nationalism by incorporating modes of feminist cultural production. Conceptually, the author focuses on organizing, cooking, dancing, mapping, and inscribing--practices traditionally viewed as women's work--to theorize the lives and work of "ordinary women" and to offer a feminist critique of notions of individuality and community in relation to (black) nationalism. Thorsson's study builds on and extends the work of Madhu Dubey's Black Women Novelists and the Nationalist Aesthetic (1994), but in some chapters--e.g., the one in which she explores Toni Morrison's Paradise and posits the novel's act of inscription as distinct from both paratext and palimpsest--the author enters sophisticated new theoretical terrain. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. P. Naick Coe College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Courtney Thorsson is Associate Professor of English at the University of Oregon.</p>

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