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Government by dissent : protest, resistance, and radical democratic thought in the early American republic / Robert W.T. Martin.

By: Martin, Robert W. T. (Robert William Thomas), 1967-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814738863; 0814738869.Subject(s): Government, Resistance to -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Government by dissent.DDC classification: 973.3/18 LOC classification: E310 | .M37 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Regulation not rebellion : from "rough music" to democratic disorder -- "Secret plodders" : anti-federalism, anonymity, and the struggle for democratic dissent -- Institutionalizing counterpublicity : the democratic societies of the 1790s -- James Madison : public opinion and dissentient democracy -- "Salutary collisions" and multiple discourses : a farmer, two lawyers, and one unknown democrat -- "The saucy sons of enquiry" : Thomas Cooper and democratic dissent.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E310 .M37 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qghsm Available ocn844939467

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Regulation not rebellion : from "rough music" to democratic disorder -- "Secret plodders" : anti-federalism, anonymity, and the struggle for democratic dissent -- Institutionalizing counterpublicity : the democratic societies of the 1790s -- James Madison : public opinion and dissentient democracy -- "Salutary collisions" and multiple discourses : a farmer, two lawyers, and one unknown democrat -- "The saucy sons of enquiry" : Thomas Cooper and democratic dissent.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Martin (government, Hamilton College; The Free and Open Press: The Founding of American Democratic Press Liberty, 1640-1800, CH, Jun'02, 39-6096) dissolves myths about the era of the American Revolution, showing that the years following it were anything but peaceful. Regulator movements and Shays' Rebellion in advance of the Constitution, along with similar uprisings thereafter such as the famous Whiskey Rebellion, only scratch the surface of discontent beneath which one finds a vast layer of political dissent. Following 1787, the elite ruling class differed over the role of dissent, i.e., Alexander Hamilton's views as opposed to those of James Madison. Lesser-known individuals through John Adams's Federalist administration published their opposing political perceptions, often to their detriment (e.g., incarceration under the terms of the Sedition Act, 1798). Dissent--Martin refers to it as "dissentist democracy"--is heroic in its intent, and those over time who have had the courage to be dissenters should be celebrated. The late Pauline Maier's Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787-1788 (CH, Apr'11, 48-4676) provides excellent background. Those with interests in the early national period will find Martin's research a must. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

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