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The new encyclopedia of Southern culture. Volume 23, Folk art / Carol Crown & Cheryl Rivers, volume editors.

Contributor(s): Crown, Carol | Rivers, Cheryl, 1949- | University of Mississippi. Center for the Study of Southern Culture.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2013Description: 1 online resource (xx, 480 pages, [16] pages of plates) : illustrations (some color).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469608006; 1469608006.Other title: Folk art.Subject(s): Folk art -- Southern States -- History | Art, American -- Southern States -- EncyclopediasAdditional physical formats: Print version:: New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.DDC classification: 745.076 LOC classification: NK811 | .F65 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Folk art is one of the American South's most significant areas of creative achievement, and this comprehensive yet accessible reference details that achievement from the sixteenth century through the present. This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture explores the many forms of aesthetic expression that have characterized southern folk art, including the work of self-taught artists, as well as the South's complex relationship to national patterns of folk art collecting. Fifty-two thematic essays examine subjects ranging from colonial portraiture, Moravian material culture, and sou.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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NK811 .F65 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469607993_crown Available ocn845257795

"Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi."

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Folk art is one of the American South's most significant areas of creative achievement, and this comprehensive yet accessible reference details that achievement from the sixteenth century through the present. This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture explores the many forms of aesthetic expression that have characterized southern folk art, including the work of self-taught artists, as well as the South's complex relationship to national patterns of folk art collecting. Fifty-two thematic essays examine subjects ranging from colonial portraiture, Moravian material culture, and sou.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This monographic series updates and expands the acclaimed Encyclopedia of Southern Culture (Univ. of North Carolina, 1989). This latest volume provides a comprehensive examination of folk art and its relationship to the American South. The late 20th century saw a flowering of folk art, an aspect of Southern culture that is often less known than others, making this volume an important addition to the series. Although the original work contained only 18 articles on folk art, this new series recognizes it as a distinctive aesthetic concern, drawing historical and cultural connections among topics as diverse as pottery, paintings, prison art, schoolgirl samplers, weathervanes, calligraphy, and roadside art. An opening overview essay establishes a definition of folk art and provides a framework for understanding this category of art outside the mainstream. Fifty-one thematic essays then address materials culture (bottles, quilts, toys), settings (prisons, yards, playgrounds), places (Lowcountry, Caribbean, Texas), and traditions (Latino, Moravian, Jewish). More than 200 biographical entries cover major folk and self-taught artists in the region. VERDICT Although it is sparsely illustrated for a volume on the subject, this work provides a comprehensive presentation of traditional and contemporary folk art in the American South and will help the discipline find a place in American art history. It will be of interest to scholars, collectors, and enthusiasts of Southern art and culture.-Julia A. Watson, Marywood Univ. Lib., Scranton, PA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The 1989 Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, edited by Wilson and William Ferris (CH, Nov'89, 27-1293) had no category for folk art. But there has been an "explosion of scholarship" on this topic (see K. G. Congdon's American Folk Art, CH, Oct'12, 50-0609), and The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture offers this new volume about self-taught artists alongside volume 21, Art and Architecture, edited by J. H. Bonner and E. C. Pennington (2013). The introductory essay documents, for the period from the 1700s to the present, the collection, appreciation, and documentation of folk art by individuals with major roles in its history. Following this essay are more than 50 signed contributions on topics including "Landscape Painting," "Memory Painting," "Visionary Art," "Baskets," "Face Jugs," "Quilts," "Portraitures," "Gravestone Carving," "Baskets," "Frakturs," and "Festivals and Fairs." The volume features some 200 short, signed, mainly biographical entries about the artists (some, such as Clementine Hunter and William Edmondson, are part of the established art world). All entries include updated bibliographies. The galleries and museums displaying these artists' work are included. Information on the artists' motivations for creating art--e.g., to record memories of everyday life as a means of recovering from an injury or illness, for self-expression, and often by God's direction--are found throughout. Color plates provide a small sampling of the art. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers. N. M. Lambert University of South Carolina Upstate

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