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Adapting nineteenth-century France : literature in film, theatre, television, radio and print / Kate Griffiths and Andrew Watts.

By: Griffiths, Kate.
Contributor(s): Watts, Andrew.
Material type: TextTextSeries: French and francophone studies: Publisher: Cardiff : University of Wales Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (x, 235 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780708325957; 0708325955.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Adapting Nineteenth-Century France : Literature in Film, Theatre, Television, Radio and Print.DDC classification: 840.9007 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Labyrinths of voices : Emile Zola, Germinal and radio / Kate Griffiths -- Diamond thieves and gold diggers : Balzac, silent cinema and spoils of adaptation / Andrew Watts -- Fragmented fictions : time, textual memory and the (re)writing of Madame Bovary / Andrew Watts -- Les Miserables, theatre and anxiety of excess / Andrew Watts -- Chez Maupassant : the (in)visible space of television adaption / Kate Griffiths -- Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours : Verne Todd, Coraci and the spectropoetics of adaptation / Kate Griffiths.
Summary: This book focuses on adaptations in and of nineteenth-century France, assessing the reworking of Emile Zola in radio, Honoré de Balzac in silent cinema, Gustave Flaubert in contemporary fiction, Victor Hugo in musical theatre, Guy de Maupassant in television and Jules Verne in sound film.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
P92.F8 G75 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qhk6q Available ocn846951396

Includes bibliographical references and index.

This book focuses on adaptations in and of nineteenth-century France, assessing the reworking of Emile Zola in radio, Honoré de Balzac in silent cinema, Gustave Flaubert in contemporary fiction, Victor Hugo in musical theatre, Guy de Maupassant in television and Jules Verne in sound film.

Chapter One : Labyrinths of voices : Emile Zola, Germinal and radio / Kate Griffiths -- Chapter Two : Diamond thieves and gold diggers : Balzac, silent cinema and spoils of adaptation / Andrew Watts -- Chapter Three : Fragmented fictions : time, textual memory and the (re)writing of Madame Bovary / Andrew Watts -- Chapter Four : Les Miserables, theatre and anxiety of excess / Andrew Watts -- Chapter Five : Chez Maupassant : the (in)visible space of television adaption / Kate Griffiths -- Chapter Six : Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours : Verne Todd, Coraci and the spectropoetics of adaptation / Kate Griffiths.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This important book represents an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the aesthetics and ideology of adaptations (cinema, theater, radio, television, graphic novels) of the works of six major 19th-century French novelists. Griffiths (Cardiff Univ., UK) wrote the introduction and the chapters on Zola, Maupassant, and Verne; Watts (Univ. of Birmingham, UK) contributed the conclusion and the chapters on Balzac, Flaubert, and Hugo. As Watts underscores: "Specific adaptations, as the case studies explored in this book have sought to demonstrate, reflect not just on themes of their source text, but on their own existence as adapted artifacts." The adaptations studied tend to "both reflect and dramatize their own status as adaptations." But there are revealing moments about the creative process of the writers because Griffiths and Watts explore as well influences of myth, history, folklore, literature, and theater. This book leads one to comprehend how sometimes these novelists thought of their oeuvres in "adaptive terms." Another important conclusion of the study: adaptation across time and nations represents the social and ethical issues that called for a particular work to be adapted and modulated to the contemporary needs. The book is well documented and positions the adapted and the adaptive works in a detailed sociohistorical context. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. I. Ivantcheva-Merjanska University of Cincinnati

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