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Copts in Michigan / Eliot Dickinson.

By: Dickinson, Eliot [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Discovering the peoples of Michigan: Publisher: East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (x, 92 pages :) : illustrations, map.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780870139093; 0870139096.Subject(s): Copts -- Michigan -- History | Egyptian Americans -- Michigan -- History | Immigrants -- Michigan -- History | Social networks -- Michigan -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Copts in Michigan.DDC classification: 977.40088/28172 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Who are the Copts? -- Historical legacy -- Forced migration -- Immigrating to Michigan -- The Coptic community -- An evolving identity.
Summary: The Copts, or Egyptian Christians, are a relatively small and tight-knit ethno-religious group, numbering perhaps three thousand people and living mostly in the Detroit metropolitan area. Since they began immigrating to Michigan in the mid-1960s, their community has grown exponentially. Granted exceptional access to the Coptic community, Eliot Dickinson provides the first in- depth profile of this unique and remarkably successful immigrant group. Drawing on personal interviews to infuse the book with warmth and depth. Copts in Michigan offers readers a compelling view into this vibrant co.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F575.E38 D53 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.14321/j.ctt7ztctd Available ocn846986842

Includes bibliographical references (pages 75-86) and index.

Who are the Copts? -- Historical legacy -- Forced migration -- Immigrating to Michigan -- The Coptic community -- An evolving identity.

The Copts, or Egyptian Christians, are a relatively small and tight-knit ethno-religious group, numbering perhaps three thousand people and living mostly in the Detroit metropolitan area. Since they began immigrating to Michigan in the mid-1960s, their community has grown exponentially. Granted exceptional access to the Coptic community, Eliot Dickinson provides the first in- depth profile of this unique and remarkably successful immigrant group. Drawing on personal interviews to infuse the book with warmth and depth. Copts in Michigan offers readers a compelling view into this vibrant co.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (JSTOR, viewed October 27, 2016).

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