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The naked communist : Cold War modernism and the politics of popular culture / Roland Végső.

By: Végső, Roland.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : Fordham University Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (245 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780823252534; 0823252531; 9780823250356; 0823250350; 9780823245598; 0823245594.Subject(s): Anti-communist movements in literature | Cold War in literature | Political fiction, American -- History and criticism | Spy stories, American -- History and criticism | Atomic bomb in literature | Modernism (Literature) -- United States | Nineteen fiftiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 973.921 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Anti-Communist Politics. The Aesthetic Unconscious -- Anti-Communist Politics and the Limits of Representation -- The Enemy, the Secret, and the Catastrophe -- Anti-Communist Aesthetic Ideology -- Anti-Communist Fiction. One World: Nuclear Holocausts -- Two Worlds: Stolen Secrets -- Three Worlds: Global Enemies.
Summary: 'The Naked Communist' argues that the political ideologies of modernity were fundamentally determined by four basic figures the world, the enemy, the secret, and the catastrophe.Summary: "The book argues that the political ideologies of modernity were determined in a fundamental manner by four basic figures: the world, the enemy, the secret, and the catastrophe. While the "world" names the totality that functioned as the ultimate horizon of modern political imagination, the three other figures define the necessary limits of this totality by reflecting on the limits of representation. Although the four figures have formed a number of different historical constellations, the book highlights their enduring presence in the modern imagination through the detailed analysis of one concrete historical example: American anti-Communist politics of the 1950s. Within this historical context, the primary objective of the book is to describe the internal mechanisms of what we could call an anti-Communist "aesthetic ideology." The book traces the way anti-Communist popular culture emerged in the discourse of Cold War liberalism as a political symptom of modernism. Based on a discursive analysis of American anti-Communist politics, the book presents parallel readings of modernism and popular fiction from the 1950s (nuclear holocaust novels, spy novels, and popular political novels) in order to show that in spite of the radical separation of the two cultural fields they both participated in a common ideological program."--Publisher's abstract.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E743.5 .V44 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt13x09vv Available ocn847731628

Includes bibliographical references and index.

'The Naked Communist' argues that the political ideologies of modernity were fundamentally determined by four basic figures the world, the enemy, the secret, and the catastrophe.

Part I: Anti-Communist Politics. The Aesthetic Unconscious -- Anti-Communist Politics and the Limits of Representation -- The Enemy, the Secret, and the Catastrophe -- Anti-Communist Aesthetic Ideology -- Part II: Anti-Communist Fiction. One World: Nuclear Holocausts -- Two Worlds: Stolen Secrets -- Three Worlds: Global Enemies.

"The book argues that the political ideologies of modernity were determined in a fundamental manner by four basic figures: the world, the enemy, the secret, and the catastrophe. While the "world" names the totality that functioned as the ultimate horizon of modern political imagination, the three other figures define the necessary limits of this totality by reflecting on the limits of representation. Although the four figures have formed a number of different historical constellations, the book highlights their enduring presence in the modern imagination through the detailed analysis of one concrete historical example: American anti-Communist politics of the 1950s. Within this historical context, the primary objective of the book is to describe the internal mechanisms of what we could call an anti-Communist "aesthetic ideology." The book traces the way anti-Communist popular culture emerged in the discourse of Cold War liberalism as a political symptom of modernism. Based on a discursive analysis of American anti-Communist politics, the book presents parallel readings of modernism and popular fiction from the 1950s (nuclear holocaust novels, spy novels, and popular political novels) in order to show that in spite of the radical separation of the two cultural fields they both participated in a common ideological program."--Publisher's abstract.

Print version record.

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