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Recognition, sovereignty struggles, & indigenous rights in the United States : a sourcebook / edited by Amy E. Den Ouden & Jean M. O'Brien.

Contributor(s): Den Ouden, Amy E [editor.] | O'Brien, Jean M [editor.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2013]Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (365 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469608099; 146960809X.Other title: Recognition, sovereignty struggles, and indigenous rights in the United States.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Civil rights | Indigenous peoples -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States | Indians of North America -- Legal status, laws, etc | Indians of North America -- Government relations | States' rights (American politics)Additional physical formats: Print version:: Recognition, sovereignty struggles, & indigenous rights in the United States.DDC classification: 342.7308/72 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Race, identity, and recognition : The imposition of law : the federal acknowledgment process and the legal de/construction of tribal identity / Angela A. Gonzales and Timothy Q. Evans -- Racial science and federal recognition : Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South / Malinda Maynor Lowery -- The recognition of NAGPRA : a human rights promise deferred / Joanne Barker -- State recognition of American Indian Tribes : a survey of state-recognized tribes and state recognized processes / K. Alexa Koenig and Jonathan Stein -- State and federal recognition in New England : State recognition and "termination" in nineteenth-century New England / Jean M. O'Brien -- Altered state? : Indian policy narratives, federal recognition, and the "new" war on native rights in Connecticut / Amy E. Den Ouden -- How you see us, why you don't : Connecticut's public policy to terminate Schaghticoke Indians / Ruth Garby Torres -- The Nipmuc Nation, federal acknowledgment, and a case of mistaken identity / Rae Gould -- Contemporary recognition controversies : A right delayed : the Brothertown Indian Nation's story of surviving the federal acknowledgment process / Kathleen A. Brown-Perez -- From "Boston men" to the BIA : the unacknowledged Chinook Nation / John R. Robinson -- Mapping erasure : the power of nominative cartography in the past and present of the Muwekma Ohlones of the San Francisco Bay Area / Les W. Field with Alan Leventhal and Rosemary Cambra -- Precarious positions : native Hawaiians and U.S. federal recognition / J. Kēhaulani Kauanui -- David E. Wilkins.
Summary: This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide.-- Publisher description.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF8210.C5 R43 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469602172_obrien Available ocn848895449

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part I. Race, identity, and recognition : The imposition of law : the federal acknowledgment process and the legal de/construction of tribal identity / Angela A. Gonzales and Timothy Q. Evans -- Racial science and federal recognition : Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South / Malinda Maynor Lowery -- The recognition of NAGPRA : a human rights promise deferred / Joanne Barker -- State recognition of American Indian Tribes : a survey of state-recognized tribes and state recognized processes / K. Alexa Koenig and Jonathan Stein -- Part II. State and federal recognition in New England : State recognition and "termination" in nineteenth-century New England / Jean M. O'Brien -- Altered state? : Indian policy narratives, federal recognition, and the "new" war on native rights in Connecticut / Amy E. Den Ouden -- How you see us, why you don't : Connecticut's public policy to terminate Schaghticoke Indians / Ruth Garby Torres -- The Nipmuc Nation, federal acknowledgment, and a case of mistaken identity / Rae Gould -- Part III. Contemporary recognition controversies : A right delayed : the Brothertown Indian Nation's story of surviving the federal acknowledgment process / Kathleen A. Brown-Perez -- From "Boston men" to the BIA : the unacknowledged Chinook Nation / John R. Robinson -- Mapping erasure : the power of nominative cartography in the past and present of the Muwekma Ohlones of the San Francisco Bay Area / Les W. Field with Alan Leventhal and Rosemary Cambra -- Precarious positions : native Hawaiians and U.S. federal recognition / J. Kēhaulani Kauanui -- Afterword / David E. Wilkins.

This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide.-- Publisher description.

Online resource (HeinOnline, viewed September 8, 2016).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The contested terrain of federal recognition--the formal status of tribal nations that are acknowledged by the US as having standing in a government-to-government relationship--is the timely subject of this edited collection of essays. The editors provide an excellent overview of the importance of federal recognition to a tribal nation's identity, culture, and political rights. Most of the contributors to this impressive volume hold the position that the benefits of this unique political status outweigh wholesale rejection of it. All explore the paradoxical and contradictory process the federal government employs, arguing that it is neither neutral nor definitive. Non-Natives (and some tribal nations) see the quest for federal recognition as one for finite resources, and while the possibility of operating a casino often overshadows (and dooms) a tribe's application for federal recognition, the contributors insightfully go beyond this debate to consider the larger implications of tribal sovereignty. Fundamentally, the authors argue, federal recognition is deeply embedded in history and how one understands the past. In so doing, they call attention to the efforts of tribal leaders who have fought to exercise sovereignty, honoring their work and persistence. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. K. L. Ackley The Evergreen State College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Amy E. Den Ouden is associate professor of women's studies at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. She is author of Beyond Conquest: Native Peoples and the Struggle for History in New England .<br> <br> Jean M. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe) is professor of history at the University of Minnesota. She is author of Dispossession by Degrees: Indian Land and Identity in Natick, Massachusetts, 1650-1790 , and Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England .

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