The Nature of The Beasts : Empire and Exhibition At The Tokyo Imperial Zoo / Ian Jared Miller ; foreword by Harriet Ritvo.

By: Miller, Ian Jared, 1970- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksAsia--local studies/global themes: 27.Publisher: Berkeley, CA : University of California Press, [2013]Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (xxvii, 322 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780520952102; 0520952103; 129967738X; 9781299677388Other title: Empire and Exhibition At The Tokyo Imperial ZooSubject(s): Zoos -- Social aspects -- Japan -- History | Philosophy of nature -- Japan -- History | Nature and civilization -- Japan -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Nature of the beasts.DDC classification: 590.52/135 LOC classification: QL76.5.J32 | M55 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: Animals in the Anthropocene -- Ecological Modernity in Japan -- The Natural World as Exhibition -- pt. ONE THE NATURE OF CIVILIZATION -- 1. Japan's Animal Kingdom: The Origins of Ecological Modernity and the Birth of the Zoo -- Bringing Politics to Life -- Sorting Animals Out in Meiji Japan -- Animals in the Exhibitionary Complex -- The Ueno Zoo -- Ishikawa Chiyomatsu and the Evolution of Exhibition -- Bigot's Japan -- Conclusion -- 2. The Dreamlife of Imperialism: Commerce, Conquest, and the Naturalization of Ecological Modernity -- The Dreamlife of Empire -- The Nature of Empire -- Nature Behind Glass -- Backstage at the Zoo -- The Illusion of Liberty -- Imperial Trophies -- Imperial Nature -- Conclusion -- pt. TWO THE CULTURE OF TOTAL WAR -- 3. Military Animals: The Zoological Gardens and the Culture of Total War -- Military Animals -- Mobilizing the Animal World -- The Eye of the Tiger -- Animal Soldiers -- Horse Power -- Conclusion -- 4. The Great Zoo Massacre -- The Culture of Total Sacrifice -- A Strange Sort of Ceremony -- Mass-Mediated Sacrifice -- The Taxonomy of a Massacre -- The Killing Floor -- And Then There Were Two -- Conclusion -- pt. THREE AFTER EMPIRE -- 5. The Children's Zoo: Elephant Ambassadors and Other Creatures of the Allied Occupation -- Bambi Goes to Tokyo -- Empire after Empire -- Neocolonial Potlatch -- "Animal Kindergarten" -- Occupied Japan's Elephant Mania -- Elephant Ambassadors -- Conclusion -- 6. Pandas in the Anthropocene: Japan's "Panda Boom" and the Limits of Ecological Modernity -- The "Panda Boom" -- The Science of Charisma -- Panda Diplomacy -- "Living Stuffed Animals" -- The Nature of Copyright -- The Biotechnology of Cute -- Conclusion.
Summary: It is widely known that such Western institutions as the museum, the university, and the penitentiary shaped Japan's emergence as a modern nation-state. Less commonly recognized is the role played by the distinctly hybrid institution-at once museum, laboratory, and prison-of the zoological garden. In this eye-opening study of Japan's first modern zoo, Tokyo's Ueno Imperial Zoological Gardens, opened in 1882, Ian Jared Miller offers a refreshingly unconventional narrative of Japan's rapid modernization and changing relationship with the natural world. As the first zoological garden in the wo.
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QL76.5.J32 M55 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt3fh2wj Available ocn851157936

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 285-322) and index.

It is widely known that such Western institutions as the museum, the university, and the penitentiary shaped Japan's emergence as a modern nation-state. Less commonly recognized is the role played by the distinctly hybrid institution-at once museum, laboratory, and prison-of the zoological garden. In this eye-opening study of Japan's first modern zoo, Tokyo's Ueno Imperial Zoological Gardens, opened in 1882, Ian Jared Miller offers a refreshingly unconventional narrative of Japan's rapid modernization and changing relationship with the natural world. As the first zoological garden in the wo.

Machine generated contents note: Animals in the Anthropocene -- Ecological Modernity in Japan -- The Natural World as Exhibition -- pt. ONE THE NATURE OF CIVILIZATION -- 1. Japan's Animal Kingdom: The Origins of Ecological Modernity and the Birth of the Zoo -- Bringing Politics to Life -- Sorting Animals Out in Meiji Japan -- Animals in the Exhibitionary Complex -- The Ueno Zoo -- Ishikawa Chiyomatsu and the Evolution of Exhibition -- Bigot's Japan -- Conclusion -- 2. The Dreamlife of Imperialism: Commerce, Conquest, and the Naturalization of Ecological Modernity -- The Dreamlife of Empire -- The Nature of Empire -- Nature Behind Glass -- Backstage at the Zoo -- The Illusion of Liberty -- Imperial Trophies -- Imperial Nature -- Conclusion -- pt. TWO THE CULTURE OF TOTAL WAR -- 3. Military Animals: The Zoological Gardens and the Culture of Total War -- Military Animals -- Mobilizing the Animal World -- The Eye of the Tiger -- Animal Soldiers -- Horse Power -- Conclusion -- 4. The Great Zoo Massacre -- The Culture of Total Sacrifice -- A Strange Sort of Ceremony -- Mass-Mediated Sacrifice -- The Taxonomy of a Massacre -- The Killing Floor -- And Then There Were Two -- Conclusion -- pt. THREE AFTER EMPIRE -- 5. The Children's Zoo: Elephant Ambassadors and Other Creatures of the Allied Occupation -- Bambi Goes to Tokyo -- Empire after Empire -- Neocolonial Potlatch -- "Animal Kindergarten" -- Occupied Japan's Elephant Mania -- Elephant Ambassadors -- Conclusion -- 6. Pandas in the Anthropocene: Japan's "Panda Boom" and the Limits of Ecological Modernity -- The "Panda Boom" -- The Science of Charisma -- Panda Diplomacy -- "Living Stuffed Animals" -- The Nature of Copyright -- The Biotechnology of Cute -- Conclusion.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Miller (Harvard) uses the history of the Ueno Zoo in Tokyo to craft a social history of Japan, holding the zoo up as a mirror to the social and political attitudes that surrounded and formed it and that, in turn, the zoo helped shape. The Ueno Zoo can, in its beginnings, be seen as a Japanese response to the rapid industrialization and loss of natural spaces in the country and as a desire to be not only as good as but also better than the Western countries it was learning from. But it can also be seen as a justification of colonial conquest, culturally unifying symbolic sacrifices during WW II, the politics of normalizing relations with other countries afterward, and the politics of where exactly the divide is between science and nature. This rare book leaves readers wanting a longer, more detailed account so there is room for more explorations of the points the author raises. This excellent work presents a novel alternative resource for understanding a century of politics and social change in Japan. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic and general library collections. P. L. Kantor formerly, Southern Vermont College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MillerIan Jared:

Ian Jared Miller teaches Japanese history at Harvard University.

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