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The green and the gray : the Irish in the Confederate States of America / David T. Gleeson.

By: Gleeson, David T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Civil War America: ; Civil War America (Series): Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 307 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469612508; 146961250X.Subject(s): Irish American soldiers -- Confederate States of America -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Green and the gray.DDC classification: 973.7/420899162 LOC classification: E585.I75 | G56 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: the fighting Irish -- Reluctant secessionists: the Irish, southern politics, and the birth of the Confederacy -- Irish rebels, southern rebels: the Irish join the Confederate Army -- Faugh a ballagh! (clear the way!): the Irish in the Confederate Army -- Hard times: the Irish on the home front -- For God, Erin, and Carolina: Irish Catholics in the Confederacy -- Another "lost cause": the Irish after the Confederacy -- Conclusion: ambiguous Confederates.
Summary: Why did many Irish Americans, who did not have a direct connection to slavery, choose to fight for the Confederacy? This perplexing question is at the heart of this sweeping analysis of the Irish in the Confederate States of America. Taking a broad view of the subject, it considers the role of Irish southerners in the debates over secession and the formation of the Confederacy, their experiences as soldiers, the effects of Confederate defeat for them and their emerging ethnic identity, and their role in the rise of Lost Cause ideology.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E585.I75 G56 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469607573_gleeson Available ocn856519228
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
E580.9 .L65 2015 Lone Star Blue and Gray : E581 .S54 2007 Why confederates fought : E585.C54 D73 2008 Confederate phoenix : E585.I75 G56 2013 The green and the gray : E600 | E600 .B83 2014 Lincoln's Trident : E601 War Stories : E601 .S94 2019 Such anxious hours :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction: the fighting Irish -- Reluctant secessionists: the Irish, southern politics, and the birth of the Confederacy -- Irish rebels, southern rebels: the Irish join the Confederate Army -- Faugh a ballagh! (clear the way!): the Irish in the Confederate Army -- Hard times: the Irish on the home front -- For God, Erin, and Carolina: Irish Catholics in the Confederacy -- Another "lost cause": the Irish after the Confederacy -- Conclusion: ambiguous Confederates.

Print version record.

Why did many Irish Americans, who did not have a direct connection to slavery, choose to fight for the Confederacy? This perplexing question is at the heart of this sweeping analysis of the Irish in the Confederate States of America. Taking a broad view of the subject, it considers the role of Irish southerners in the debates over secession and the formation of the Confederacy, their experiences as soldiers, the effects of Confederate defeat for them and their emerging ethnic identity, and their role in the rise of Lost Cause ideology.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Gleeson (Northumbria Univ., UK) deftly dismantles folklore surrounding notions of Irish bravery and treachery both on the battlefield and on the home front during the War of the Rebellion. He argues that the Irish in the Confederacy, both native and foreign born, were not monolithic in thought and action when it came to ideas of secession. In fact, many Southern Irish were late in their support of the Confederacy. Irish involvement with the Confederacy, Gleeson stresses, was more nuanced than previous scholarship claimed, because exaggerated tales of glory and conquest too often clashed with the realities of this conflict. The author expertly intertwines his discussion of Confederate military recruitment efforts of the Irish and their domestic support of Southern war aims while connecting these to conceptions of nationalism for both Confederates and the Irish. The author concludes, "Irish Confederates did not have a major impact on the overall war effort." However, the dedication of the ex-Confederate Irish to the mythology of the lost cause endeared them to their Southern compatriots. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and general readers. J. M. O'Leary Kent State University

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