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Muslim American women on campus : undergraduate social life and identity / Shabana Mir.

By: Mir, Shabana [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource (xi, 204 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469612614; 1469612615; 9781469610801; 1469610809.Subject(s): Muslim women -- United States -- Social life and customs | Women college students -- United States -- Conduct of life | Women college students -- United States -- Social life and customs | Muslim women -- Conduct of life | Muslims -- United States -- Ethnic identityGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Muslim American women on campusDDC classification: 305.6/97 Other classification: REL037000 | SOC028000 | SOC002010 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Muslim American women in campus culture -- I didn't want to have that outcast belief about alcohol: Walking the tightrope of alcohol in campus culture -- You can't really look normal and dress modestly: Muslim women and their clothes on campus -- Let them be normal and date: Muslim American undergraduate women in a sexualized campus culture.
Summary: "Shabana Mir's powerful ethnographic study of women on Washington, D.C., college campuses reveals that being a young female Muslim in post-9/11 America means experiencing double scrutiny--scrutiny from the Muslim community as well as from the dominant non-Muslim community. Muslim American Women on Campus illuminates the processes by which a group of ethnically diverse American college women, all identifying as Muslim and all raised in the United States, construct their identities during one of the most formative times in their lives. Mir, an anthropologist of education, focuses on key leisure practices--drinking, dating, and fashion--to probe how Muslim American students adapt to campus life and build social networks that are seamlessly American, Muslim, and youthful. In this lively and highly accessible book, we hear the women's own often poignant voices as they articulate how they find spaces within campus culture as well as their Muslim student communities to grow and assert themselves as individuals, women, and Americans. Mir concludes, however, that institutions of higher learning continue to have much to learn about fostering religious diversity on campus"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "Shabana Mir's powerful ethnographic study of women on Washington, D.C., college campuses reveals that being a young female Muslim in post-9/11 America means experiencing double scrutiny--scrutiny from the Muslim community as well as from the dominant non-Muslim community. Muslim American Women on Campus illuminates the processes by which a group of ethnically diverse American college women, all identifying as Muslim and all raised in the United States, construct their identities during one of the most formative times in their lives"-- Provided by publisher.
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Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1170 .M567 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469610801_mir Available ocn861692592

Includes bibliographical references (pages 189-199) and index.

Print version record.

"Shabana Mir's powerful ethnographic study of women on Washington, D.C., college campuses reveals that being a young female Muslim in post-9/11 America means experiencing double scrutiny--scrutiny from the Muslim community as well as from the dominant non-Muslim community. Muslim American Women on Campus illuminates the processes by which a group of ethnically diverse American college women, all identifying as Muslim and all raised in the United States, construct their identities during one of the most formative times in their lives. Mir, an anthropologist of education, focuses on key leisure practices--drinking, dating, and fashion--to probe how Muslim American students adapt to campus life and build social networks that are seamlessly American, Muslim, and youthful. In this lively and highly accessible book, we hear the women's own often poignant voices as they articulate how they find spaces within campus culture as well as their Muslim student communities to grow and assert themselves as individuals, women, and Americans. Mir concludes, however, that institutions of higher learning continue to have much to learn about fostering religious diversity on campus"-- Provided by publisher.

"Shabana Mir's powerful ethnographic study of women on Washington, D.C., college campuses reveals that being a young female Muslim in post-9/11 America means experiencing double scrutiny--scrutiny from the Muslim community as well as from the dominant non-Muslim community. Muslim American Women on Campus illuminates the processes by which a group of ethnically diverse American college women, all identifying as Muslim and all raised in the United States, construct their identities during one of the most formative times in their lives"-- Provided by publisher.

Muslim American women in campus culture -- I didn't want to have that outcast belief about alcohol: Walking the tightrope of alcohol in campus culture -- You can't really look normal and dress modestly: Muslim women and their clothes on campus -- Let them be normal and date: Muslim American undergraduate women in a sexualized campus culture.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This extremely accessible ethnographic study of 26 undergraduate Muslim females attending George Washington and Georgetown universities explores their campus lives as minorities under a cloud of suspicion. There is a general understanding that for those going to college, life will drastically change, as there will be some cultural exchanges, perhaps study abroad, and the beginnings of a professional life. Mir (global studies and anthropology, Millikin Univ.) introduces readers to an alternative reality for minorities—identity silencing and strategies of the stigmatized. In chapters focused on headscarves, drugs, dating, and gender stereotyping, readers learn a great deal. Mir's pool of subjects is diverse, but most share ethnic/religious family expectations of dress, chastity, and piety. There is a series of responses to the marginalization from campus life--compliance with norms, resistance, or quasi-adoption. In an environment of drug/alcohol use, some acquiesced and drank sometimes, while others stuck to their sodas. The Muslim claim that Muslims do not date was found to be in error, as it was euphemistically disguised as friendships. Under pressure by family to remain unscathed by the hedonistic atmosphere of college life and by peers to join in makes life complicated and stressful. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. A. B. McCloud DePaul University

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