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After civil rights : racial realism in the new American workplace / John D. Skrentny.

By: Skrentny, John David [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 397 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400848492; 1400848490.Subject(s): Discrimination in employment -- United States | Race discrimination -- United States | Civil service -- United States | Civil rights -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: After civil rightsDDC classification: 331.13/30973 LOC classification: HD4903.5.U58 | S5697 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Managing race in the American workplace -- Leverage : racial realism in business and the professions -- We the people : racial realism in politics and government -- Displaying race for dollars : racial realism in media and entertainment -- The Jungle revisited? : racial realism in the low-skilled sector -- Bringing practice, law, and values together.
Summary: "What role should racial difference play in the American workplace? As a nation, we rely on civil rights law to address this question, and the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964 seemingly answered it: race must not be a factor in workplace decisions. In After Civil Rights, John Skrentny contends that after decades of mass immigration, many employers, Democratic and Republican political leaders, and advocates have adopted a new strategy to manage race and work. Race is now relevant not only in negative cases of discrimination, but in more positive ways as well. In today's workplace, employers routinely practice 'racial realism, ' where they view race as real--as a job qualification. Many believe employee racial differences, and sometimes immigrant status, correspond to unique abilities or evoke desirable reactions from clients or citizens. They also see racial diversity as a way to increase workplace dynamism. The problem is that when employers see race as useful for organizational effectiveness, they are often in violation of civil rights law. After Civil Rights examines this emerging strategy in a wide range of employment situations, including the low-skilled sector, professional and white-collar jobs, and entertainment and media. In this important book, Skrentny urges us to acknowledge the racial realism already occurring, and lays out a series of reforms that, if enacted, would bring the law and lived experience more in line, yet still remain respectful of the need to protect the civil rights of all workers"--Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD4903.5.U58 S5697 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt4cgb4p Available ocn862077305

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Managing race in the American workplace -- Leverage : racial realism in business and the professions -- We the people : racial realism in politics and government -- Displaying race for dollars : racial realism in media and entertainment -- The Jungle revisited? : racial realism in the low-skilled sector -- Bringing practice, law, and values together.

"What role should racial difference play in the American workplace? As a nation, we rely on civil rights law to address this question, and the monumental Civil Rights Act of 1964 seemingly answered it: race must not be a factor in workplace decisions. In After Civil Rights, John Skrentny contends that after decades of mass immigration, many employers, Democratic and Republican political leaders, and advocates have adopted a new strategy to manage race and work. Race is now relevant not only in negative cases of discrimination, but in more positive ways as well. In today's workplace, employers routinely practice 'racial realism, ' where they view race as real--as a job qualification. Many believe employee racial differences, and sometimes immigrant status, correspond to unique abilities or evoke desirable reactions from clients or citizens. They also see racial diversity as a way to increase workplace dynamism. The problem is that when employers see race as useful for organizational effectiveness, they are often in violation of civil rights law. After Civil Rights examines this emerging strategy in a wide range of employment situations, including the low-skilled sector, professional and white-collar jobs, and entertainment and media. In this important book, Skrentny urges us to acknowledge the racial realism already occurring, and lays out a series of reforms that, if enacted, would bring the law and lived experience more in line, yet still remain respectful of the need to protect the civil rights of all workers"--Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Arguing against race-blind hiring policies and for employers to recognize racial difference (and diversity in general) as an asset, professor and author Skrentny insists that civil rights laws be amended to encourage this change of attitude. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Since the election of President Barack Obama, there has been much discussion of whether the US has entered a postracial age, in which race no longer matters. It turns out that obituaries devoted to the death of race have been premature. Race still matters in the US. Skrentny (sociology, Univ. of California San Diego) explores what he refers to as "racial realism," especially as it pertains to the workplace. Racial realism refers to the belief that the concept and concreteness of race have potential applications and usefulness at work. As Skrentny notes, "Race has mattered to American employers since the beginning of the Republic, but some recent and very big changes have added new complexity." These developments, which include demographic shifts, economic changes, political and legal events, and organizational perspectives, have all contributed to a new debate and discussion around what race means today. The author delves into this through extensive research in various sectors of work. The result is a realization that the models of the past 40 years may no longer be relevant, raising the need for a reexamination of how current norms and practices coexist or conflict with current policies and laws. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. G. C. David Bentley University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John D. Skrentny is professor of sociology and director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His books include The Minority Rights Revolution and The Ironies of Affirmative Action: Politics, Culture, and Justice in America .

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