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Living with brain injury : narrative, community, and women's renegotiation of identity / J. Eric Stewart.

By: Stewart, J. Eric [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Qualitative studies in psychology: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, 2013 2013)Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814770221; 0814770223.Subject(s): Women -- Physiology -- Social aspects | Women -- Health and hygiene -- Psychological aspects | Brain damage -- Patients -- Rehabilitation -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Living with brain injury : narrative, community, and women's renegotiation of identity.DDC classification: 617.4/810443 LOC classification: RC387.5 | .S745 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- People and methodology -- Meeting post-injury -- Oneself as another -- Fighting -- Sense (and sensibility) of community -- Wrestling with an angel -- Coda.
Summary: "When Nancy was in her late twenties, she began having blinding headaches, tunnel vision, and dizziness, which led to the discovery of an abnormality on her brain stem. Complications during surgery caused serious brain damage, resulting in partial paralysis of the left side of her body and memory and cognitive problems. Although she was constantly evaluated by her doctors, Nancy's own questions and her distress got little attention in the hospital. Later, despite excellent job performance post-injury, her physical impairments were regarded as an embarrassment to the 'perfect' and 'beautiful' corporate image of her employer. Many conversations about brain injury are deficit-focused: those with disabilities are typically spoken about by others, as being a problem about which something must be done. In Living with Brain Injury, J. Eric Stewart takes a new approach, offering narratives which highlight those with brain injury as agents of recovery and change in their own lives. Stewart draws on in-depth interviews with ten women with acquired brain injuries to offer an evocative, multi-voiced account of the women's strategies for resisting marginalization and of their process of making sense of new relationships to self, to family and friends, to work, and to community. Bridging psychology, disability studies, and medical sociology, Living with Brain Injury showcases how--and on what terms--the women come to re-author identity, community, and meaning post-injury. In the Qualitative Studies in Psychology series J. Eric Stewart is a Clinical-Community Psychologist and Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RC387.5 .S745 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qfhjt Available ocn862135527

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"When Nancy was in her late twenties, she began having blinding headaches, tunnel vision, and dizziness, which led to the discovery of an abnormality on her brain stem. Complications during surgery caused serious brain damage, resulting in partial paralysis of the left side of her body and memory and cognitive problems. Although she was constantly evaluated by her doctors, Nancy's own questions and her distress got little attention in the hospital. Later, despite excellent job performance post-injury, her physical impairments were regarded as an embarrassment to the 'perfect' and 'beautiful' corporate image of her employer. Many conversations about brain injury are deficit-focused: those with disabilities are typically spoken about by others, as being a problem about which something must be done. In Living with Brain Injury, J. Eric Stewart takes a new approach, offering narratives which highlight those with brain injury as agents of recovery and change in their own lives. Stewart draws on in-depth interviews with ten women with acquired brain injuries to offer an evocative, multi-voiced account of the women's strategies for resisting marginalization and of their process of making sense of new relationships to self, to family and friends, to work, and to community. Bridging psychology, disability studies, and medical sociology, Living with Brain Injury showcases how--and on what terms--the women come to re-author identity, community, and meaning post-injury. In the Qualitative Studies in Psychology series J. Eric Stewart is a Clinical-Community Psychologist and Associate Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Introduction -- People and methodology -- Meeting post-injury -- Oneself as another -- Fighting -- Sense (and sensibility) of community -- Wrestling with an angel -- Coda.

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