Confederate slave impressment in the upper South / Jaime Amanda Martinez.

By: Martinez, Jaime Amanda [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksCivil War America: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (233 pages : illustrations, maps)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469612591; 1469612593Subject(s): Slavery -- Confederate States of America | War and society -- Confederate States of AmericaAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Confederate slave impressment in the upper South.DDC classification: 973.7/415 LOC classification: E453 | .M263 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Hundreds have been called: slave impressment at the local and state levels, 1861-1863 -- Throwing up breastworks: slave laborers under the Engineer Bureau -- Provisions are needed worse than fortifications: slave impressment and Confederate agriculture -- To equalize the burden: slave impressment and the expanding Confederate state, 1863-1864 -- The president's mishap: from engineer laborers to potential Confederate soldiers, 1864-1865 -- Epilogue: Black Confederates' slave impressment and Confederate memory.
Summary: Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South.
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E453 .M263 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469610757_martinez Available ocn865024724

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Hundreds have been called: slave impressment at the local and state levels, 1861-1863 -- Throwing up breastworks: slave laborers under the Engineer Bureau -- Provisions are needed worse than fortifications: slave impressment and Confederate agriculture -- To equalize the burden: slave impressment and the expanding Confederate state, 1863-1864 -- The president's mishap: from engineer laborers to potential Confederate soldiers, 1864-1865 -- Epilogue: Black Confederates' slave impressment and Confederate memory.

Confederate Slave Impressment in the Upper South.

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CHOICE Review

Martinez (Univ. of North Carolina at Pembroke) examines Confederate impressment of Southern slaves at the local, state, and federal levels during the US Civil War. Focusing on Virginia and North Carolina, she argues that the two states, in addition to being significant to the war effort, provided examples of slave impressment that helped the Confederate national government develop its own efficient system. Despite other scholars' arguments about the Confederate government's decentralization and ineffectiveness, one of the author's main contentions is that the national government's implementation of slave impressment actually illustrated its competence. Martinez also shows that some of the populace naturally opposed this government-imposed impressment, though it was quite effective. In addition to threatening the continuation of productive agriculture and encouraging slave escape, national control over impressment threatened states' rights, thus requiring significant political negotiation to be implemented. A valuable contribution to the literature for these reasons, Martinez's work is also useful for the new insight it provides into the effect of impressment on slaves and slaveholders both during and after the war. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. K. Byron Dalton State College

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