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Domains and divisions of European history / edited by Johann P. Arnason and Natalie J. Doyle.

Contributor(s): Árnason, Jóhann Páll, 1940- | Doyle, Natalie J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies in social and political thought: 18.Publisher: Liverpool : Liverpool University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (xi, 244 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1846315255; 9781846315251.Subject(s): Regionalism -- Europe -- History | European federation -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 320.4 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: The main emphasis of this book is on the multiple but interrelated divisions that have shaped the course of European history and crystallised in different patterns during successive phases. The question of European unity is discussed extensively in the first section, and later chapters include references to the perceptions and interpretations of unity that have developed in different parts of a divided Europe. The book lays particular stress on one region, Central or East Central Europe, and the debates that have developed around it.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JN34.5 .D66 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vjmjj Available ocn865564880

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The main emphasis of this book is on the multiple but interrelated divisions that have shaped the course of European history and crystallised in different patterns during successive phases. The question of European unity is discussed extensively in the first section, and later chapters include references to the perceptions and interpretations of unity that have developed in different parts of a divided Europe. The book lays particular stress on one region, Central or East Central Europe, and the debates that have developed around it.

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