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Saints and citizens : indigenous histories of colonial missions and Mexican California / Lisbeth Haas.

By: Haas, Lisbeth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, [2014]Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (271 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780520956742; 0520956745; 0520280628; 9780520280625.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Ethnic identity | Indians of North America -- Land tenure -- California -- History | Indians of North America -- Missions -- California -- History | Indians, Treatment of -- California | Missions, Spanish -- California -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Saints and Citizens : Indigenous Histories of Colonial Missions and Mexican California.DDC classification: 305.8970794 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Maps and Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Saints and Indigenous Citizens; 1. Colonial Settlements on Indigenous Land; 2. Becoming Indian in Colonial California; 3. The Politics of the Image; 4. "All the Horses Are in the Possession of the Indians": Th e Chumash War; 5. "We Solicit Our Freedom": Citizenship and the Patria; 6. Indigenous Landowners and Native Ingenuity on the Borderlands of Northern Mexico; Conclusion: Indigenous Archives and Knowledge; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S.
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Summary: 'Saints and Citizens' is a bold new excavation of the history of indigenous people in California in the late 18th and 19th centuries, showing how the missions became sites of their authority, memory, and identity.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E78.C15 H225 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt5hjhhx Available ocn865853684

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (ebrary, viewed November 26, 2013).

'Saints and Citizens' is a bold new excavation of the history of indigenous people in California in the late 18th and 19th centuries, showing how the missions became sites of their authority, memory, and identity.

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; List of Maps and Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Saints and Indigenous Citizens; 1. Colonial Settlements on Indigenous Land; 2. Becoming Indian in Colonial California; 3. The Politics of the Image; 4. "All the Horses Are in the Possession of the Indians": Th e Chumash War; 5. "We Solicit Our Freedom": Citizenship and the Patria; 6. Indigenous Landowners and Native Ingenuity on the Borderlands of Northern Mexico; Conclusion: Indigenous Archives and Knowledge; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S.

Tu; v; w; y; z.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Much that has been written about the late-18th- and early-19th-century Spanish missions of California and the Southwest has succeeded in generating polarized cultural representations that ultimately pit Spanish/Mexican and Franciscan values against Native Californians and indigenous lifeways. Despite a growing body of archival, ethnohistorical, and archaeological evidence to the contrary, the die has been cast. Native Californians and the indigenous traditions of the region thereby remain captive to essentialized characterizations of a martyred and subject people bereft of voice and agency, or native transcript and authority. Leading California historian Haas (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz) presents a stunning new departure from the often politicized and/or politically (in)correct diatribes of the day. The breathtaking sweep of this meticulously researched, deeply nuanced, and thereby critically important (forensic) treatment effectively succeeds in giving voice and vision to the indigenous histories of early California. Haas succeeds by virtue of interrogating questions of authority, identity, and memory from the vantage point of the unbounded indigenous landscapes that coexisted with (i.e., absorbed, transformed, accommodated, co-opted, and resisted) the colonial programs and projects of the day. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. R. G. Mendoza California State University, Monterey Bay

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