Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Savage portrayals : race, media, and the Central Park jogger story / Natalie P. Byfield.

By: Byfield, Natalie P, 1960- [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (viii, 233 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781439906354; 1439906351.Subject(s): Rape -- Press coverage -- New York (State) -- New York -- Case studies | Violent crimes -- Press coverage -- New York (State) -- New York -- Case studies | Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- New York (State) -- New York -- Case studies | African Americans in mass media | Hispanic Americans in mass media | Racism -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Savage portrayalsDDC classification: 364.15/32097471 LOC classification: HV6568.N5 | B94 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Reconnecting new forms of inequality to their roots -- A jogger is raped in Central Park -- The position of the black man in the cult of (white) womanhood -- Salvaging the "savage": a racial frame that refuses to die -- A participant observes how content emerges -- The "facts" emerge to convict the innocent -- The case falls apart: media's brief mea culpa -- Selling savage portrayals: incorporating young black males in the carceral state -- They didn't do it!
Summary: In 1989, the rape and beating of a white female jogger in Central Park made international headlines. Many accounts reported the incident as an example of "wilding"--Episodes of poor, minority youths roaming the streets looking for trouble. Police intent on immediate justice for the victim coerced five African-American and Latino boys to plead guilty. The teenage boys were quickly convicted and imprisoned. Natalie Byfield, who covered the case for the New York Daily News, now revisits the story of the Central Park Five from her perspective as a black female reporter in Savage Port.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV6568.N5 B94 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt14bt6kc Available ocn867630408

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reconnecting new forms of inequality to their roots -- A jogger is raped in Central Park -- The position of the black man in the cult of (white) womanhood -- Salvaging the "savage": a racial frame that refuses to die -- A participant observes how content emerges -- The "facts" emerge to convict the innocent -- The case falls apart: media's brief mea culpa -- Selling savage portrayals: incorporating young black males in the carceral state -- They didn't do it!

Print version record.

In 1989, the rape and beating of a white female jogger in Central Park made international headlines. Many accounts reported the incident as an example of "wilding"--Episodes of poor, minority youths roaming the streets looking for trouble. Police intent on immediate justice for the victim coerced five African-American and Latino boys to plead guilty. The teenage boys were quickly convicted and imprisoned. Natalie Byfield, who covered the case for the New York Daily News, now revisits the story of the Central Park Five from her perspective as a black female reporter in Savage Port.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Byfield brings bifocal vision to her analysis of media treatment of the Central Park Jogger story, which she covered in her first career as a journalist for the New York Daily News. The woman iconically referred to as the "Central Park Jogger" was savagely beaten and raped during a late-night run in Central Park in 1989. Shortly thereafter, five teenage boys-not coincidentally African American and Hispanic-were apprehended and confessed to the crime. The problem is that they were innocent and their confessions had been coerced. Tragically, the young men all served substantial jail time before a known violent rapist confessed that he was the actual perpetrator and his claim was substantiated by DNA evidence. From her current perspective as a sociologist (St. John's Univ.), Byfield reexamines the horrific event in light of after-acquired evidence and scholarly methodology, particularly content analysis of news coverage, and she tells a revised story in which issues of race, class, and media bias taint the justice system. VERDICT A chilling, ultimately instructive portrayal of savage injustice. This book would be best read alongside of, and in contradistinction to, Trisha Meili's I Am the Central Park Jogger: A Story of Hope and Possibility.-Lynne Maxwell, West Virginia Univ. Coll. of Law Lib., Morgantown (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Natalie P. Byfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at St. John's University in Queens, New York. She has also taught in Journalism and Media Studies. She is a former Staff Writer for the New York Daily News .

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.