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The Tokyo Rose case : treason on trial / Yasuhide Kawashima.

By: Kawashima, Yasuhide, 1931-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Landmark law cases & American society.Publisher: Lawrence, Kansas : University Press of Kansas, 2013Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 189 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780700619795; 0700619798.Subject(s): Trials (Treason) -- California -- San FranciscoAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Tokyo Rose case.DDC classification: 345.73/0231 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Born on the Fourth of July -- "Aunt Shizu is sick" -- A dozen roses -- The American paparazzi -- The Attorney General's abrupt decision -- Assembling witnesses and the jury selection -- The prosecution's case -- The defense rebuttal -- The verdict and the sentence -- Appeals, threat of deportation, and pardon.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF224.T63 K39 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1d4txs5 Available ocn867742119

Includes bibliographical references (pages 173-177) and index.

Born on the Fourth of July -- "Aunt Shizu is sick" -- A dozen roses -- The American paparazzi -- The Attorney General's abrupt decision -- Assembling witnesses and the jury selection -- The prosecution's case -- The defense rebuttal -- The verdict and the sentence -- Appeals, threat of deportation, and pardon.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Unlike earlier entries in the University Press of Kansas's series on landmark American legal cases, this account of the 1949 prosecution of "Tokyo Rose" is hardly evenhanded. Kawashima (history, Univ. of Texas, El Paso) draws on both Japanese and American sources to tell the story of the unfortunate Iva Toguri, a US citizen trapped in Japan during WW II. She was bullied into broadcasting propaganda intended to damage the morale of American troops, though she always maintained that she intended to subvert that propaganda effort. Because she caused little damage, and because they could not prove that she possessed the necessary treasonous intent, US authorities initially recommended against prosecuting her. But for political reasons, she was indicted for treason. Kawashima argues that the prosecution was legally flawed, and his book is most valuable for its lucid discussion of the consequences of the unique constitutional status of the crime of treason. He also argues, probably correctly, that Toguri's trial itself was riddled with misconduct. Nevertheless, she was convicted. Though later pardoned, she never escaped the stigma. Kawashima thinks coram nobis relief could expunge the taint, but that would not kill the legend of Tokyo Rose. Summing Up: Recommended. General readers and upper-division undergraduate students. P. Lermack emeritus, Bradley University

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