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Our man in Mexico : Winston Scott and the hidden history of the CIA / Jefferson Morley ; foreword by Michael Scott.

By: Morley, Jefferson [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Description: 1 online resource (1 PDF (xii, 371 pages)).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1306862752; 9781306862752; 9780700619726; 0700619720.Subject(s): Spies -- Mexico -- Biography | Spies -- United States -- Biography | Intelligence officers -- Mexico -- Biography | Intelligence officers -- United States -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 327.1273072092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface to the paperback edition -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Over the mountains are mountains -- Chapter 2. Development without structural change in Sangongni households -- Chapter 3. Development and the influence of a mountain environment -- Chapter 4. Subsistence, productivity, and household adaptation -- Chapter 5. Energy flow and allocation of household labor -- Chapter 6. The changing family cycle -- Chapter 7. Industrialization, migration, and land-tenure patterns -- Chapter 8. Organization, structure, and the explanation of social change -- Appendix -- Notes -- Guide to Romanization -- A note on weights and measures -- References -- Index.
Summary: He reveals how the elder Scott ran hundreds of covert espionage operations from his headquarters in the U.S. Embassy while keeping three Mexican presidents on the agency's payroll, participating in the Bay of Pigs fiasco, and, most intriguingly, overseeing the surveillance of Lee Harvey Oswald during his visit to the Mexican capital just weeks before the assassination of President Kennedy." "Morley reveals the previously unknown scope of the agency's interest in Oswald in late 1963, identifying for the first time the code names of Scott's surveillance programs that monitored Oswald's movements. He shows that CIA headquarters cut Scott out of the loop of the agency's latest reporting on Oswald before Kennedy was killed. He documents why Scott came to reject a key finding of the Warren Report on the assassination and how his disillusionment with the agency came to worry his longtime friend James Jesus Angleton, legendary chief of CIA counterintelligence. Angleton not only covered up the agency's interest in Oswald but also, after Scott died, absconded with the only copies of his unpublished memoir." "Interweaving Win Scott's personal and professional lives, Morley has crafted a real-life thriller of Cold War intrigue - a compelling saga of espionage that uncovers another chapter in the CIA's history.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK468.I6 S376 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1ckpbs5 Available ocn867742171

Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-294) and index.

Preface to the paperback edition -- Acknowledgments -- Chapter 1. Over the mountains are mountains -- Chapter 2. Development without structural change in Sangongni households -- Chapter 3. Development and the influence of a mountain environment -- Chapter 4. Subsistence, productivity, and household adaptation -- Chapter 5. Energy flow and allocation of household labor -- Chapter 6. The changing family cycle -- Chapter 7. Industrialization, migration, and land-tenure patterns -- Chapter 8. Organization, structure, and the explanation of social change -- Appendix -- Notes -- Guide to Romanization -- A note on weights and measures -- References -- Index.

He reveals how the elder Scott ran hundreds of covert espionage operations from his headquarters in the U.S. Embassy while keeping three Mexican presidents on the agency's payroll, participating in the Bay of Pigs fiasco, and, most intriguingly, overseeing the surveillance of Lee Harvey Oswald during his visit to the Mexican capital just weeks before the assassination of President Kennedy." "Morley reveals the previously unknown scope of the agency's interest in Oswald in late 1963, identifying for the first time the code names of Scott's surveillance programs that monitored Oswald's movements. He shows that CIA headquarters cut Scott out of the loop of the agency's latest reporting on Oswald before Kennedy was killed. He documents why Scott came to reject a key finding of the Warren Report on the assassination and how his disillusionment with the agency came to worry his longtime friend James Jesus Angleton, legendary chief of CIA counterintelligence. Angleton not only covered up the agency's interest in Oswald but also, after Scott died, absconded with the only copies of his unpublished memoir." "Interweaving Win Scott's personal and professional lives, Morley has crafted a real-life thriller of Cold War intrigue - a compelling saga of espionage that uncovers another chapter in the CIA's history.

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