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People's own landscape : nature, tourism, and dictatorship in East Germany / Scott Moranda.

By: Moranda, Scott.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Social history, popular culture, and politics in Germany: Publisher: Ann Arbor [Michigan] : The University of Michigan Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1306463572; 9781306463577; 9780472029723; 047202972X.Subject(s): Tourism -- Germany (East) -- History | Landscapes -- Germany (East) -- History | Land use -- Germany (East) -- History | Nature -- Effect of human beings on -- Germany (East) -- History | Ecology -- Germany (East) -- History | Political culture -- Germany (East) -- History | Dictatorship -- Social aspects -- Germany (East) -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: People's Own Landscape.DDC classification: 914.0 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Chapter 1. Conquering the Countryside : Athletic Tourism in the Early GDR -- Chapter 2. Rejuvenating Socialist Workers : Conservation and Landscape Care in the 1950s -- Chapter 3. Making Rough Nature More Comfortable : Camping in East Germany -- Chapter 4. A New Environmental Law : Landscape Care, Global Ecology, and Domestic Social Policy -- Chapter 5. Real Existing Socialism : Nature, Social Inequalities, and Environmental Consciousness -- Chapter 6. The Limits of Growth and the New Environmentalism.
Summary: East Germany's Socialist Unity Party aimed to placate a public well aware of the higher standards of living enjoyed elsewhere by encouraging them to participate in outdoor activities and take vacations in the countryside. Scott Moranda considers East Germany's rural landscapes from the perspective of both technical experts (landscape architects, biologists, and physicians) who hoped to dictate how vacationers interacted with nature, and the vacationers themselves, whose outdoor experience shaped their understanding of environmental change. As authorities eliminated traditional tourist and nature conservation organizations, dissident conservationists demanded better protection of natural spaces. At the same time, many East Germans shared their government's expectations for economic development that had real consequences for the land. By the 1980s, environmentalists saw themselves as outsiders struggling against the state and a public that had embraced mainstream ideas about limitless economic growth and material pleasures. - See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/4573218/peoples_own_landscape#sthash.O7TerG8w.dpuf -- Publisher's website.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
G155.G3 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.3998/mpub.4573218 Available ocn871189594

Print version record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Chapter 1. Conquering the Countryside : Athletic Tourism in the Early GDR -- Chapter 2. Rejuvenating Socialist Workers : Conservation and Landscape Care in the 1950s -- Chapter 3. Making Rough Nature More Comfortable : Camping in East Germany -- Chapter 4. A New Environmental Law : Landscape Care, Global Ecology, and Domestic Social Policy -- Chapter 5. Real Existing Socialism : Nature, Social Inequalities, and Environmental Consciousness -- Chapter 6. The Limits of Growth and the New Environmentalism.

East Germany's Socialist Unity Party aimed to placate a public well aware of the higher standards of living enjoyed elsewhere by encouraging them to participate in outdoor activities and take vacations in the countryside. Scott Moranda considers East Germany's rural landscapes from the perspective of both technical experts (landscape architects, biologists, and physicians) who hoped to dictate how vacationers interacted with nature, and the vacationers themselves, whose outdoor experience shaped their understanding of environmental change. As authorities eliminated traditional tourist and nature conservation organizations, dissident conservationists demanded better protection of natural spaces. At the same time, many East Germans shared their government's expectations for economic development that had real consequences for the land. By the 1980s, environmentalists saw themselves as outsiders struggling against the state and a public that had embraced mainstream ideas about limitless economic growth and material pleasures. - See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/4573218/peoples_own_landscape#sthash.O7TerG8w.dpuf -- Publisher's website.

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