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The ethics of organ transplantation / edited by Steven J. Jensen.

Contributor(s): Jensen, Steven J, 1964-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Washington, District of Columbia : Catholic University of America Press, 2011Copyright date: ©2011Description: 1 online resource (369 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813219332; 0813219337.Subject(s): Transplantation of organs, tissues, etc. -- Moral and ethical aspects | Medical ethicsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Ethics of organ transplantation.DDC classification: 617.9/54 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Brain death: Primum non nocere : a contrarian ethic? / Robert E. Hurley -- Controversies surrounding brain death / D. Alan Shewmon -- Ontological status of whole-brain-dead individuals / Jason T. Eberl -- Consciousness and aesthetics in decisions concerning organ donation using anencephalic neonates / A.A. Howsepian. -- Donation after cardiac death : Organ donation following cardiac death : conflicts of interest, ante mortem interventions, and determinations of death / Christopher Kaczor -- Ethical concerns with rapid organ recovery ambulances / L.M. Whetstine. -- The dead donor rule: Allow the dying to donate : replace the dead donor rule / Thomas I. Cochrane -- A Catholic view on the dead donor rule / Witold Kania -- Killing and letting die / Steven J. Jensen. -- Gift or conscription?: Organ donation and the beatific vision : Thomist moral theology confronts the tide of relativism / Romanus Cessario, O.P. -- The meaning of gift in organ transplantation / Thomas Hurley -- Ethics of contact with China on transplants / David Matas -- Corollaries and history: Gestational surrogacy and live organ donation : a contrast / Thomas L. Cook -- Organ transplants : a study on bioethics and the ordinary magisterium / Janet E. Smith.
Summary: "An ever-increasing demand for organs, with over 100,000 people on waiting lists, has driven a relentless search for new sources of organs. In 1995 the American Medical Association supported taking organs from anencephalic infants, children born without brains. In 1999 the Chinese government began removing organs from members of the politically outcast religious group Falun Gong, making a lucrative profit from sales to foreigners. Recently in Belgium physicians have euthanized a patient by removing her organs. The search for fresh organs began much earlier, in 1968, when death was redefined, so that well-preserved organs could be removed from brain dead individuals. The early 1990s saw the introduction of donation after cardiac death, in which organs are taken from individuals whose hearts could still be resuscitated. Over the last two decades various countries have attempted markets in the sale of organs". --Backcover.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
RD120.7 .E83 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fgpsr Available ocn876043250

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

pt. 1. Brain death: Primum non nocere : a contrarian ethic? / Robert E. Hurley -- Controversies surrounding brain death / D. Alan Shewmon -- Ontological status of whole-brain-dead individuals / Jason T. Eberl -- Consciousness and aesthetics in decisions concerning organ donation using anencephalic neonates / A.A. Howsepian. -- pt. 2. Donation after cardiac death : Organ donation following cardiac death : conflicts of interest, ante mortem interventions, and determinations of death / Christopher Kaczor -- Ethical concerns with rapid organ recovery ambulances / L.M. Whetstine. -- pt. 3. The dead donor rule: Allow the dying to donate : replace the dead donor rule / Thomas I. Cochrane -- A Catholic view on the dead donor rule / Witold Kania -- Killing and letting die / Steven J. Jensen. -- pt. 4. Gift or conscription?: Organ donation and the beatific vision : Thomist moral theology confronts the tide of relativism / Romanus Cessario, O.P. -- The meaning of gift in organ transplantation / Thomas Hurley -- Ethics of contact with China on transplants / David Matas -- pt. 5. Corollaries and history: Gestational surrogacy and live organ donation : a contrast / Thomas L. Cook -- Organ transplants : a study on bioethics and the ordinary magisterium / Janet E. Smith.

"An ever-increasing demand for organs, with over 100,000 people on waiting lists, has driven a relentless search for new sources of organs. In 1995 the American Medical Association supported taking organs from anencephalic infants, children born without brains. In 1999 the Chinese government began removing organs from members of the politically outcast religious group Falun Gong, making a lucrative profit from sales to foreigners. Recently in Belgium physicians have euthanized a patient by removing her organs. The search for fresh organs began much earlier, in 1968, when death was redefined, so that well-preserved organs could be removed from brain dead individuals. The early 1990s saw the introduction of donation after cardiac death, in which organs are taken from individuals whose hearts could still be resuscitated. Over the last two decades various countries have attempted markets in the sale of organs". --Backcover.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This small volume provides a brief, clear introduction to the ethical theory of Thomas Aquinas. Writing for an undergraduate audience, Jensen (Univ. of St. Thomas, Houston) touches on all of the basic themes central to Thomistic moral theory. He includes a discussion of the relation between reason and emotion; a treatment of the meaning of--and distinction between--moral and intellectual virtue; and an analysis of the steps the moral agent must consider in order to make a thoughtful decision. The book also features separate chapters on the classical virtues of justice and prudence, together with a concluding reflection on the connection between the study of ethics and the nature of the good life. Jensen generally avoids polemics, but he does offer a rebuttal to moral relativism and a helpful defense of the significance of "intrinsically evil acts." Though the work is intended for philosophical novices, advanced students in ethics can read it with some profit. Its lone deficiency is its brevity; a study of Thomistic ethics should include a more comprehensive account of natural law. This will be a useful book for teachers and students of moral and political philosophy. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through researchers/faculty. W. P. Haggerty Gannon University

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