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Caring across generations : the linked lives of Korean American families / Grace J. Yoo and Barbara W. Kim.

By: Yoo, Grace J.
Contributor(s): Kim, Barbara W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource (xii, 215 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780814771983; 081477198X.Subject(s): Korean Americans -- Social conditions | Korean Americans -- Family relationships | Older immigrants -- United States -- Social conditions | Adult children of immigrants -- United States | Adult children of aging parents -- United States | Immigrant families -- United States -- Social conditionsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Caring across generationsDDC classification: 973/.04957 Other classification: SOC026010 | SOC002010 | SOC005000 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "More than 1.3 million Korean Americans live in the United States, the majority of them foreign-born immigrants and their children, the so-called 1.5 and second generations. While many sons and daughters of Korean immigrants outwardly conform to the stereotyped image of the upwardly mobile, highly educated super-achiever, the realities and challenges that the children of Korean immigrants face in their adult lives as their immigrant parents grow older and confront health issues that are far more complex. In Caring Across Generations, Grace J. Yoo and Barbara W. Kim explore how earlier experiences helping immigrant parents navigate American society have prepared Korean American children for negotiating and redefining the traditional gender norms, close familial relationships, and cultural practices that their parents expect them to adhere to as they reach adulthood. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 137 second and 1.5 generation Korean Americans, Yoo & Kim explore issues such as their childhood experiences, their interpreted cultural traditions and values in regards to care and respect for the elderly, their attitudes and values regarding care for aging parents, their observations of parents facing retirement and life changes, and their experiences with providing care when parents face illness or the prospects of dying. A unique study at the intersection of immigration and aging, Caring Across Generations provides a new look at the linked lives of immigrants and their families, and the struggles and triumphs that they face over many generations"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E184.K6 Y756 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qfv2j Available ocn881183547

"More than 1.3 million Korean Americans live in the United States, the majority of them foreign-born immigrants and their children, the so-called 1.5 and second generations. While many sons and daughters of Korean immigrants outwardly conform to the stereotyped image of the upwardly mobile, highly educated super-achiever, the realities and challenges that the children of Korean immigrants face in their adult lives as their immigrant parents grow older and confront health issues that are far more complex. In Caring Across Generations, Grace J. Yoo and Barbara W. Kim explore how earlier experiences helping immigrant parents navigate American society have prepared Korean American children for negotiating and redefining the traditional gender norms, close familial relationships, and cultural practices that their parents expect them to adhere to as they reach adulthood. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 137 second and 1.5 generation Korean Americans, Yoo & Kim explore issues such as their childhood experiences, their interpreted cultural traditions and values in regards to care and respect for the elderly, their attitudes and values regarding care for aging parents, their observations of parents facing retirement and life changes, and their experiences with providing care when parents face illness or the prospects of dying. A unique study at the intersection of immigration and aging, Caring Across Generations provides a new look at the linked lives of immigrants and their families, and the struggles and triumphs that they face over many generations"-- Provided by publisher.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Yoo (San Francisco State Univ.) and Kim (California State Univ., Long Beach) use in-depth interviews with 137 adult children of Korean immigrants in the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas to examine how the children of immigrants understand their family lives and make care-giving decisions about aging parents. They begin with discussions of the childhood experiences of Korean children of immigrants. Long before they faced caring for aging parents, the respondents frequently had to act as intermediaries between parents and the larger American society. The authors explore Korean American accounts of parents' pre-migration histories in the troubled Korea of an earlier era and investigate how these histories created views of obligations and duties toward parents. Yoo and Kim then link these perceptions of background to cultural continuities by considering how Korean Americans understand what being Korean means and how they pass ideas of culture on to their children. In an inquiry into gender, the authors analyze differences between men and women in relations with immigrant parents. Finally, the authors describe how Korean Americans make decisions about health care for their parents and the costs and benefits of intergenerational connections. This well-written, sensitive work provides insight into the family lives of one of the largest Asian American groups. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Carl Leon Bankston, Tulane University

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