Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The spirit of compromise : why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it / Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson.

By: Gutmann, Amy.
Contributor(s): Thompson, Dennis F. (Dennis Frank), 1940-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton ; Oxford : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (xxiii, 279 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400851249; 1400851246.Subject(s): Political planning -- United States | Decision making -- United States | Compromise (Ethics) | Consensus (Social sciences) -- United States | Democracy -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Spirit of compromise.DDC classification: 320.60973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: Two compromises -- Characteristics of compromise -- Mindsets of compromise; Valuing compromise: Costs of not compromising -- Vulnerabilities of compromise -- Limits of compromise -- Limits of history; Resisting compromise: The makeup of mindsets -- principled tenacity -- mutual mistrust -- uncompromising multiplied; Seeking compromise: Principled prudence -- Mutual respect -- Economizing on disagreement -- A moment of compromise -- Compromising in an uncompromising time; Campaigning v. governing: Requisites of campaigning -- Two conceptions of democracy -- Campaigns without end; Governing with campaigning: Space for governing -- Term time -- Time is money -- Primary pressures -- More participation? -- Minding the media -- Strengthening civic education; Conclusion: The uses of mindsets -- Doubts and compromise -- The dilemma of reform -- The support of citizens.
Summary: If politics is the art of the possible, then compromise is the artistry of democracy. Unless one partisan ideology holds sway over all branches of government, compromise is necessary to govern for the benefit of all citizens. A rejection of compromise biases politics in favor of the status quo, even when the rejection risks crisis. Why then is compromise so difficult in American politics today? In this book, the authors connect the rejection of compromise to the domination of campaigning over governing, the permanent campaign, in American democracy today. They show that campaigning for political office calls for a mindset that blocks compromise, standing tenaciously on principle to mobilize voters and mistrusting opponents in order to defeat them. Good government calls for an opposite cluster of attitudes and arguments, the compromising mindset, that inclines politicians to adjust their principles and to respect their opponents. It is a mindset that helps politicians appreciate and take advantage of opportunities for desirable compromise. The authors propose changes in our political institutions, processes, and mindsets that would encourage a better balance between campaigning and governing.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK468.P64 G87 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wpzt8 Available ocn881724834

"First paperback printing, with a new preface by the authors, 2014"--T.p. verso.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [219]-253) and index.

Introduction: Two compromises -- Characteristics of compromise -- Mindsets of compromise; Valuing compromise: Costs of not compromising -- Vulnerabilities of compromise -- Limits of compromise -- Limits of history; Resisting compromise: The makeup of mindsets -- principled tenacity -- mutual mistrust -- uncompromising multiplied; Seeking compromise: Principled prudence -- Mutual respect -- Economizing on disagreement -- A moment of compromise -- Compromising in an uncompromising time; Campaigning v. governing: Requisites of campaigning -- Two conceptions of democracy -- Campaigns without end; Governing with campaigning: Space for governing -- Term time -- Time is money -- Primary pressures -- More participation? -- Minding the media -- Strengthening civic education; Conclusion: The uses of mindsets -- Doubts and compromise -- The dilemma of reform -- The support of citizens.

If politics is the art of the possible, then compromise is the artistry of democracy. Unless one partisan ideology holds sway over all branches of government, compromise is necessary to govern for the benefit of all citizens. A rejection of compromise biases politics in favor of the status quo, even when the rejection risks crisis. Why then is compromise so difficult in American politics today? In this book, the authors connect the rejection of compromise to the domination of campaigning over governing, the permanent campaign, in American democracy today. They show that campaigning for political office calls for a mindset that blocks compromise, standing tenaciously on principle to mobilize voters and mistrusting opponents in order to defeat them. Good government calls for an opposite cluster of attitudes and arguments, the compromising mindset, that inclines politicians to adjust their principles and to respect their opponents. It is a mindset that helps politicians appreciate and take advantage of opportunities for desirable compromise. The authors propose changes in our political institutions, processes, and mindsets that would encourage a better balance between campaigning and governing.

Title from title screen (viewed June 25, 2014).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Distinguished political scientists Gutmann (president & Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Univ. of Pennsylvania) and Thompson (Alfred North Whitehead Professor of Political Philosophy, Harvard Univ.) are past coauthors (e.g., Why Deliberative Democracy?). Their latest effort is complementary to their previous works, an assessment from a new angle of how political outcomes are reached in our democracy. This book's backdrop is one of political dysfunction such as that seen in the partisan health care legislation of 2010 and the 2011 struggle to raise the federal debt ceiling. The authors show throughout the book how the "uncompromising mindsets" of participants from both parties contributed to the difficulties of these episodes, with intrusions of the "permanent campaign" and instances of "mutual mistrust" all too evident. In contrast, they advocate the necessity and value of compromise and present past examples of how politicians such as Ted Kennedy and Orrin Hatch were able to combine partisan credentials with a "compromising mindset" to achieve bipartisan successes. VERDICT Scholars will appreciate the authors' lucid analysis of the dynamics of political compromise but will likely find that part of the book stronger than their suggestions for reform.-Bob Nardini, Niagara Falls, NY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

"Compromise is difficult, but governing a democracy without compromise is impossible." So begins this excellent, much needed corrective to the contemporary political scene, which eschews compromise in politics in favor of war analogies. Today people often see adversaries as enemies, politics as a religious battle to the death, and compromise as a four-letter word; Gutmann (Univ. of Pennsylvania) and Thompson (Harvard Univ.) hope to change that. They present a reasonable, clearly argued critique of the contemporary scene and offer a reform agenda to return the US to a more pragmatic, give-and-take system of compromise, accommodation, mutual respect, and principled prudence. They walk a fine line, and their arguments are sophisticated. They realize that at times one should take a principled stand against compromise (a profiles in courage type of stance) yet bemoan the fact that so many politicians today see nearly every issue as do-or-die matter on which no compromise is possible. This excellent book should be required reading for every member of Congress, and deserves a wide readership among the voting public. Summing Up: Essential. All readership levels. M. A. Genovese Loyola Marymount University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Amy Gutmann is president of the University of Pennsylvania, where she is also the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science in the School of Arts and Sciences and professor of communication in the Annenberg School of Communication. Dennis Thompson is the Alfred North Whitehead Professor of Political Philosophy at Harvard University. Gutmann and Thompson are coauthors of Why Deliberative Democracy? (Princeton) and Democracy and Disagreement .

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.