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Liszt's final decade / Dolores Pesce.

By: Pesce, Dolores [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Eastman studies in music: v. 111.Publisher: Rochester, NY : University of Rochester Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781580468480; 1580468489; 9781580468800; 1580468802.Subject(s): Composers -- BiographyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Liszt's final decadeDDC classification: 780.92 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Decorated cleric -- Influential advocate -- A slow and perilous road to vindication -- Challenges of composition and publication -- Imagined identities -- Soul baring -- Compositional legacy -- Final words.
Summary: Liszt's Final Decade reveals in the composer's own words to his confidantes Carolyne von Sayn-Wittgenstein and Olga von Meyendorff how he resolved his conflicted self-image as a celebrated performer but underappreciated composer.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML410.L7 P38 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt5vj8d4 Available ocn883632052

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Decorated cleric -- Influential advocate -- A slow and perilous road to vindication -- Challenges of composition and publication -- Imagined identities -- Soul baring -- Compositional legacy -- Final words.

Print version record.

Liszt's Final Decade reveals in the composer's own words to his confidantes Carolyne von Sayn-Wittgenstein and Olga von Meyendorff how he resolved his conflicted self-image as a celebrated performer but underappreciated composer.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Starting in his youth and continuing into his adulthood, Liszt was the most public of 19th-century European artists. His final years were marked by a stunning and notable turning inward. Pesce (Washington Univ., St. Louis) examines closely Liszt's last period, relying more extensively on Liszt's own words, via his copious correspondence, than has any previous biographer. The volume reveals rather more of the composer's late interior life than emerges in Alan Walker's Franz Liszt: The Final Years 1861-1886, 1996), the final volume of a four-volume work that has been a standard and satisfying biography. In fact, it seems that Pesce dwells especially on areas that Walker does not emphasize, e.g., the letters (with frequent scriptural allusion, which Pesce traces well), the rates of composition and publication, and the effort to derive an image of self different from but congruent to earlier efforts. The book is annotated thoroughly and includes useful, presumably authoritative registers of the late keyboard and sacred music. This substantial scholarly inquiry sheds a different light on Liszt and his final musical undertakings. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. --Bruce J. Murray, Miami University

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