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Connected code : why children need to learn programming / Yasmin B. Kafai and Quinn Burke.

By: Kafai, Yasmin B.
Contributor(s): Burke, Quinn, 1976-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation series on digital media and learning: Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : The MIT Press, [2014]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0262319241; 9780262319249; 9780262319256; 026231925X.Subject(s): Computers and children | Computer programming -- Study and teaching (Secondary) | Scratch (Computer program language) | Constructivism (Education)Additional physical formats: Print version:: Connected codeDDC classification: 004.083 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The comeback of coding -- Connected learning -- From code to applications -- From tools to communities -- From Scratch to Remix -- From screens to tangibles -- Connected teaching -- Coding for all.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.9.C659 K34 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt9qf8rk Available ocn884478950

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The comeback of coding -- Connected learning -- From code to applications -- From tools to communities -- From Scratch to Remix -- From screens to tangibles -- Connected teaching -- Coding for all.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Kafai (Univ. of Pennsylvania) and Burke (College of Charleston) accurately describe their book as a narrative spanning 30 years of coding and education. According to the authors, there has been a resurgence of interest in coding (or programming) at the K-12 level, a phenomenon reflecting the cyclical nature of the cultural interest in educational issues; this book is the response to that interest. Beginning with the early work of Seymour Papert, who envisioned children learning through immersion in a programming culture, and progressing to a more recent concept of computation thinking from Jeannette Wing, the authors propose the idea of coding as computation participation. They view computational participation as participatory education--practical, collaborative, and creative--providing benefits to society and empowering individuals to address inequities in today's society. With this latest installment of the MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning, readers find a solid historical foundation and evolution of programming research linking practice to theory. The book, meaty and occasionally hard work to read, was definitely written to appeal to a scholarly rather than a popular audience. Practitioners and proponents of reintroduction of coding to schools will appreciate the cogent arguments on the benefits of introducing coding to students. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, and practitioners. --Catherine L. Tannahill, Eastern Connecticut State University

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