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Soul Over Lightning.

By: Gonzalez, Ray.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Camino del Sol: a Latina and Latino Literary Series.Publisher: University of Arizona Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1322029598; 9781322029597; 9780816598748; 0816598746.Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 811/.54 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: "Soul Over Lightning is a book of poems that arises from the power of landscape of the desert Southwest. It deals with cultural and political realities in recent years of growing tension on the U.S.-Mexican border as it celebrates the desert, the mountains, and the unique experiences of living along the border"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS3557.O476 A6 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt183pf4v Available ocn887123282

Print version record.

"Soul Over Lightning is a book of poems that arises from the power of landscape of the desert Southwest. It deals with cultural and political realities in recent years of growing tension on the U.S.-Mexican border as it celebrates the desert, the mountains, and the unique experiences of living along the border"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The award-winning Gonzalez (The Ghost of John Wayne) writes poetry suffused with religious allusions, and his latest work is also replete with repetition and references to the Southwest. The story line suggests a journey in which the narrator observes nature and its creatures, from sand to stars to owls to dogs. As he observes, he remembers his past encounters with these aspects of nature-some of which seem miraculous. Indeed, this book is held together by four poems titled "The Miracle" and "The Second Miracle," and so forth, with each poem alluding to the birth and rebirth of a totemic character-suggesting, perhaps, the poet's own spiritual growth. VERDICT The most well crafted of these poems are written from the inside out and tend to move through surreal imagery to arrive at an ending that feels just right, as in this ending for the title poem: "and we lie in the rain and lie inside it." But too often there is a heaviness to this collection particularly evident when the observer imposes his own agenda on the mystery of the poem and sees (to paraphrase Wallace Stevens) as he wills, not as the object is.-C. Diane Scharper, Towson Univ., MD (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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