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Capture these Indians for the lord : Indians, Methodists, and Oklahomans, 1844-1939 / Tash Smith.

By: Smith, Tash.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Tucson : University of Arizona Press, 2014Edition: Second edition.Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780816598618; 0816598614.Subject(s): Whites -- Relations with Indians | Indians, Treatment of | Indians of North America -- Cultural assimilation -- Indian Territory | Indians of North America -- Missions -- Indian Territory | Indians of North America -- Religion | Indians of North America -- Oklahoma -- History | Indians of North America -- Indian Territory -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Capture These Indians for the Lord : Indians, Methodists, and Oklahomans, 1844-1939.DDC classification: 299.7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
""Contents""; ""List of Illustrations""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""Chapter 1. The Mission Begins: Origins of the Indian Mission Conference, 1844�1865""; ""Chapter 2. Rebuilding the Mission: Efforts among the Five Tribes, 1866�1889""; ""Chapter 3. Expanding the Mission: The Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Agency after 1887""; ""Chapter 4. The Mission Changes: From the Land Run to Statehood, 1889�1907""; ""Chapter 5. Marginalizing the Mission: Indian Work after Statehood, 1907�1918""; ""Chapter 6. The Mission Reborn: The New Indian Mission, 1918�1940""; ""Conclusion""; ""Notes""
Summary: ""Exploring larger issues associated with western expansion, this book details the history of the Southern Methodist Church in Indian Territory/Oklahoma and the complex relationship between its white and Indian membership"--Provided by publisher"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E78.I5 S65 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt183p9m5 Available ocn888316163

Includes bibliographical references and index.

""Exploring larger issues associated with western expansion, this book details the history of the Southern Methodist Church in Indian Territory/Oklahoma and the complex relationship between its white and Indian membership"--Provided by publisher"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

""Contents""; ""List of Illustrations""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Introduction""; ""Chapter 1. The Mission Begins: Origins of the Indian Mission Conference, 1844�1865""; ""Chapter 2. Rebuilding the Mission: Efforts among the Five Tribes, 1866�1889""; ""Chapter 3. Expanding the Mission: The Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Agency after 1887""; ""Chapter 4. The Mission Changes: From the Land Run to Statehood, 1889�1907""; ""Chapter 5. Marginalizing the Mission: Indian Work after Statehood, 1907�1918""; ""Chapter 6. The Mission Reborn: The New Indian Mission, 1918�1940""; ""Conclusion""; ""Notes""

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Smith (St. Gregory's Univ., Oklahoma) traces almost 100 years of American Indian religious debates with and within the Southern Methodist Church in the Indian Territory that became Oklahoma. In his narrative, Smith clearly illustrates the conflict between Methodist structural authority and Indian congregations. This organizational feature or, as was often the case with Methodist circuit riders, lack of structure highlights the space between Indian autonomy and Methodist control. The author's strong examples, connections, and handling of an enormous history and historiography frame a larger story about American Indians' status in Christian and US society. This well-researched, engaging story enriches histories of missionary work among Indian peoples and helps explain the tension between the creation of peoples whose religious lives were, according to some, in need of the power of "civilization" and "uplift" that could be found in Christianity. As such, it is a recommended addition to the literature on the history of Methodism, missionary work, and Indian relations, with a focus on religious concerns surrounding displaced Native peoples. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. --Andrew R McKee, Florida State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tash Smith is an assistant professor of history at St. Gregory's University in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

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