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Invoking the invisible hand : social security and the privatization debates / Robert Asen.

By: Asen, Robert, 1968- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Rhetoric and public affairs series: Publisher: East Lansing, Mich. : Michigan State University Press, ©2009Description: 1 online resource (x, 322 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781609174996; 1609174992; 9781628952728; 1628952725.Subject(s): Social security -- Government policy -- United States | Privatization -- United States | Social security individual investment accounts -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Invoking the invisible hand.DDC classification: 368.4/300973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : The market reaches for social security -- Policy polysemy and the 1935 social security debates -- Competing metaphors of insurance and investment -- Representing target populations -- Reconstructing a time for reform -- Going public with privatization -- Conclusion : Securing a vibrant democracy.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD7125 .A775 2009 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.14321/j.ctt16wd0hf Available ocn889235670

Includes bibliographical references (pages 287-307) and index.

Introduction : The market reaches for social security -- Policy polysemy and the 1935 social security debates -- Competing metaphors of insurance and investment -- Representing target populations -- Reconstructing a time for reform -- Going public with privatization -- Conclusion : Securing a vibrant democracy.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (ACLS Humanities, viewed September 30, 2016).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Asen's central theme is that the language of the debates on Social Security in the US was premised, unfortunately, on a model of social insurance instead of a broader frame of civic duty, which would result in greater benefit to the nation. Accordingly, the debate subordinated citizenship to expertise and demonstrated a lack of faith in peoples' ability to make good judgments. The book is packed with commentary on the evolution of these debates, both in the US and abroad. Aren (communication arts, Univ. of Wisconsin) opposes market-based approaches because the latter serve nonmarket ends. Furthermore, the logic of the contributory systems grounds Social Security benefits in the individual rather than in the individual's connection to others (e.g., the intergenerational compact that stresses the bonds among people as citizens and thereby strengthens democracy). The book is well documented and directed at professionals working at advanced levels of social theory. The frequent politically influenced judgments and asides on public figures will be troubling to some. In that sense, it is less scholarly than Boomer Bust? (CH, Aug'09, 46-6910). Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate, research, and professional collections. H. I. Liebling emeritus, Lafayette College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Asen is Professor, Communication Arts Department, and an affiliate at the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2010, he received the National Communication Association Winans-Wichelns Award.

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