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Ring shout, wheel about : the racial politics of music and dance in North American slavery / Katrina Dyonne Thompson.

By: Thompson, Katrina Dyonne [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.New Black studies series: Publisher: Urbana [Illinois] : University of Illinois Press, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (257 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252096112; 0252096118.Subject(s): Slaves -- Southern States -- Songs and music | Slaves -- United States -- Social life and customs | Race in the theater -- United States -- History | Theater and society -- United States -- History | African American dance -- History | Slavery -- United States -- Justification | Plantation life -- United States | Racism in popular culture -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Ring shout, wheel about : the racial politics of music and dance in North American slavery.DDC classification: 390/.250973 Other classification: SOC001000 | PER003000 | HIS036040 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The script : "Africa was but a blank canvas for Europe's imagination" -- Casting : "They sang their home-songs, and danced, each with his free foot slapping the deck" -- Onstage : "Dance you damned niggers, dance" -- Backstage : "White folks do as they please, and the darkies do as they can" -- Advertisement : "Dancing through the Streets and act lively" -- Same script, different actors : "Eb'ry time I weel about, I jump Jim Crow" -- Epilogue : the show must go on -- --
Summary: "In this ambitious project, historian Katrina Thompson examines the conceptualization and staging of race through the performance, sometimes coerced, of black dance from the slave ship to the minstrel stage. Drawing on a rich variety of sources, Thompson explicates how black musical performance was used by white Europeans and Americans to justify enslavement, perpetuate the existing racial hierarchy, and mask the brutality of the domestic slave trade. Whether on slave ships, at the auction block, or on plantations, whites often used coerced performances to oppress and demean the enslaved. As Thompson shows, however, blacks' "backstage" use of musical performance often served quite a different purpose. Through creolization and other means, enslaved people preserved some native musical and dance traditions and invented or adopted new traditions that built community and even aided rebellion. Thompson shows how these traditions evolved into nineteenth-century minstrelsy and, ultimately, raises the question of whether today's mass media performances and depictions of African Americans are so very far removed from their troublesome roots"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E443 .T466 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt7zw5wh Available ocn889305928

Includes index.

Print verison record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The script : "Africa was but a blank canvas for Europe's imagination" -- Casting : "They sang their home-songs, and danced, each with his free foot slapping the deck" -- Onstage : "Dance you damned niggers, dance" -- Backstage : "White folks do as they please, and the darkies do as they can" -- Advertisement : "Dancing through the Streets and act lively" -- Same script, different actors : "Eb'ry time I weel about, I jump Jim Crow" -- Epilogue : the show must go on -- --

"In this ambitious project, historian Katrina Thompson examines the conceptualization and staging of race through the performance, sometimes coerced, of black dance from the slave ship to the minstrel stage. Drawing on a rich variety of sources, Thompson explicates how black musical performance was used by white Europeans and Americans to justify enslavement, perpetuate the existing racial hierarchy, and mask the brutality of the domestic slave trade. Whether on slave ships, at the auction block, or on plantations, whites often used coerced performances to oppress and demean the enslaved. As Thompson shows, however, blacks' "backstage" use of musical performance often served quite a different purpose. Through creolization and other means, enslaved people preserved some native musical and dance traditions and invented or adopted new traditions that built community and even aided rebellion. Thompson shows how these traditions evolved into nineteenth-century minstrelsy and, ultimately, raises the question of whether today's mass media performances and depictions of African Americans are so very far removed from their troublesome roots"-- Provided by publisher.

Text in English.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Katrina Dyonne Thompson is an assistant professor of history and African American studies at St. Louis University.</p> <br>

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